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The Bill Forcing Young People To Wait For The Dole Just Got Blocked Again

But the government says it will stick to its plan.

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The upper house has voted against the controversial budget measure to make under 25s wait four weeks before they can get welfare payments.

The senate rejected the government’s Social Services Legislation Amendment (Youth Employment and Other Measures) bill, 35 - 30.Labor and the Greens opposed it along with other crossbench senators, while Liberal Democrat senator David Leyonhjelm and Bob Day from Family First voted with the government.Previously, the government wanted to make young people wait six months until they could access the dole, but changed it to one month when they couldn't get it through the senate.
Stefan Postles / Getty Images

The senate rejected the government’s Social Services Legislation Amendment (Youth Employment and Other Measures) bill, 35 - 30.

Labor and the Greens opposed it along with other crossbench senators, while Liberal Democrat senator David Leyonhjelm and Bob Day from Family First voted with the government.

Previously, the government wanted to make young people wait six months until they could access the dole, but changed it to one month when they couldn't get it through the senate.

Greens senator Rachel Siewert voted against the motion, arguing that it would have trapped young people in a cycle of poverty.

“The recent inquiry on this Bill revealed that there was no international evidence that holding people off income support helped them gain employment," she said. “Instead this measure would have entrenched poverty and made life more difficult for Australian youth."
Photography Project / /Facebook: RachelSiewert

“The recent inquiry on this Bill revealed that there was no international evidence that holding people off income support helped them gain employment," she said.

“Instead this measure would have entrenched poverty and made life more difficult for Australian youth."

But don't get too excited - the government insists it is "absolutely committed to this policy".

"We remain absolutely committed to the measures we've brought to the Parliament on this issue," said social services minister Scott Morrison."We do not believe that we should be sending a message to young people that it should be ok to go from the school gate to the Centrelink front door, and that's why we're bringing these measures," he said.Last month, Morison said the government would reintroduce the bill if it was rejected in the senate.
Stefan Postles / Getty Images

"We remain absolutely committed to the measures we've brought to the Parliament on this issue," said social services minister Scott Morrison.

"We do not believe that we should be sending a message to young people that it should be ok to go from the school gate to the Centrelink front door, and that's why we're bringing these measures," he said.

Last month, Morison said the government would reintroduce the bill if it was rejected in the senate.

Alexandra Lee is a politics reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in Sydney, Australia.

Contact Alex Lee at alexandra.lee@buzzfeed.com.

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