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This Exhibition Of Black British Community Leaders In The 60s And 70s Is The Ultimate Throwback You Need To See

"Over fifty years since the concept of ‘black excellence’ first manifested and 70 years on from the Windrush."

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A new exhibition capturing the lives of Britain's black community leaders has been unveiled at the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton, London.

Anti-discrimination, women's and squatters' rights activist, Olive Morris (right) with friend Lia Obi posing in a Huey Newton style chair, used by the American Black Panthers. Olive's community work was recognised by Lambeth Council in 1986 when they named an office building Olive Morris House.
Neil Kenlock

Anti-discrimination, women's and squatters' rights activist, Olive Morris (right) with friend Lia Obi posing in a Huey Newton style chair, used by the American Black Panthers. Olive's community work was recognised by Lambeth Council in 1986 when they named an office building Olive Morris House.

Expectations: The Untold Story of Black British Community Leaders in the 60s and 70s is the powerful exhibition launched and coincides with the 70th anniversary of Windrush.

Kenlock, who was once the official photographer of the British Black Panthers, said: "Many young Black people from our community only engage with heritage when they visit museums during their educational studies. This project aims to give access to examples of Black leadership, as well as archive material outside of the normal educational environment.

"Over fifty years since the concept of ‘Black excellence’ first manifested and 70 years on from the Windrush, I truly hope the exhibition will add to the national cultural narrative and resonate with new audiences. I would like to thank the BCA and the Heritage Lottery Fund for their support in the realising of this vision."

Steve Barnard, BBC Radio Presenter (1976)

Steve Barnard was the first black DJ and presenter to play Caribbean music on mainstream radio. His show Reggae Time was pioneering for BBC London Radio. London, 1976. Steve Barnard had the first reggae show on BBC radio called Reggae Time. One of his first interviews was with Lee Scratch Perry. Steve Barnard broke boundaries as he was the first radio black radio presenter playing Caribbean music on British radio.
Neil Kenlock

Steve Barnard was the first black DJ and presenter to play Caribbean music on mainstream radio. His show Reggae Time was pioneering for BBC London Radio. London, 1976. Steve Barnard had the first reggae show on BBC radio called Reggae Time. One of his first interviews was with Lee Scratch Perry. Steve Barnard broke boundaries as he was the first radio black radio presenter playing Caribbean music on British radio.

The exhibition was unveiled August 7 and features 70 photos to celebrate the 70-year anniversary of the arrival of the Windrush in Britain. The three themes are challenges, collaboration and change.

Arthur Stanley Wint OD MBE, (1975)

Arthur Wint OD MBE, the Jamaica High Commissioner and first Jamaican Olympic gold medallist, visiting Brixton to inspire young people after the riots. Brixton 1975.
Neil Kenlock

Arthur Wint OD MBE, the Jamaica High Commissioner and first Jamaican Olympic gold medallist, visiting Brixton to inspire young people after the riots. Brixton 1975.

Darcus Howe (1970s)

Portrait of Trinidadian writer, broadcaster and activist Darcus Howe. Early 70s. Darcus Howe was from Trinidad and is one of the most influential campaigners for civil liberty. Howe, an important member of the British Black Panthers organised a Black People’s Day of Action in response to the New Cross Fire in 1981, was arrested as part of the Mangrove 9 and continued to fight for racial equality throughout his lifetime.
Neil Kenlock

Portrait of Trinidadian writer, broadcaster and activist Darcus Howe. Early 70s. Darcus Howe was from Trinidad and is one of the most influential campaigners for civil liberty. Howe, an important member of the British Black Panthers organised a Black People’s Day of Action in response to the New Cross Fire in 1981, was arrested as part of the Mangrove 9 and continued to fight for racial equality throughout his lifetime.

Lord David Pitt, Baron of Hampstead, Labour Party politician, GP and political activist (1976)

Portrait of Grenadian born Lord David Pitt, Baron of Hampstead at his home. In 1959, Pitt was the first black person in Britain to be a parliamentary candidate. He became the first black Chair the Greater London Council in 1974. He founded Campaign Against Racial Discrimination in 1964, one of the first black British civil rights organisations. London, 1976.
Neil Kenlock

Portrait of Grenadian born Lord David Pitt, Baron of Hampstead at his home. In 1959, Pitt was the first black person in Britain to be a parliamentary candidate. He became the first black Chair the Greater London Council in 1974. He founded Campaign Against Racial Discrimination in 1964, one of the first black British civil rights organisations. London, 1976.

Ade Onibada is a junior reporter at BuzzFeed and is based in London.

Contact Ade Onibada at ade.onibada@buzzfeed.com.

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