5 Adorable Pit Bulls Who Are Changing Minds

Pit Bulls make great service and therapy dogs, too!

1. Blueberry is a six-year old certified therapy dog from Massachusetts.

Before Blueberry found her forever home, she was bred for money then left as a stray.

Now she “visits rehab hospitals, nursing homes, humane societies, hospice patients, universities, and homes for the deaf and blind.”

Blueberry is a friendly pit with lots of love to give and she’s aiming to change the world’s perception of pit bulls “one visit at a time.”

2. Clairabelle is only a year and a half but she’s a full-time mobility service dog.

Clairabelle was rescued at eight weeks old.

Her previous owner moved into a home that didn’t allow pets, so for two weeks Clairabelle was living in a car 24/7. It was the middle of May, and with the temperatures climbing into the 90s, there was a strong possibility Clairabelle wouldn’t survive.

She began her service dog training at ten weeks old and initially she only helped her human pick things up.

After a back injury left her human unable to do most things on her own, Clairabelle became a full-time service dog.

3. The Stig is a registered therapy dog from Cleveland.

The blue-nose pit bull was rescued hours before his scheduled euthanization at the Cleveland Animal Shelter.

He’s only the second pit bull to be accepted into the Pet Pals therapy program.

This handsome blue-nose pit has lots of love to give and he’s changing minds one kiss at a time.

4. Booker is a seizure alert and response dog from Arizona.

Before finding his forever home, Booker was stuck at an animal shelter after being in the midst of a drug bust at his home.

At the shelter, he was dubbed “aggressive” and he was set to be euthanized.

After his human began getting seizures, Booker became a service dog for her.

Booker even allowed his human the ability to drive again because he was able to alert her to pull over before the onset of a seizure.

5. Bandit is a Diabetic Alert Dog who alerts his human when her blood sugar is getting high or low.

He’ll paw or lick his human whenever he senses that she needs to check her blood sugar.

A chemical is released when her blood sugar levels change and Bandit is able to pick up on it to help keep his human safe.

Although they often get a bad rap, every day there are pit bulls around the world who put on their vests and go to work as therapy dogs, service dogs and emotional support animals.

They’re loyal, loving, and they bring joy to everyone they meet.

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