10 Shows That May Or May Not Be The Whitest Show Of All Time

TV shows pretty often tend to have a whole lot of white people on them. In this week’s episode of Funny or Die’s “Billy on the Street,” Billy Eichner claims that Dawson’s Creek is the “whitest TV show of all time.” Here’s a case for Dawson, as well as nine other classically white programs.

1. Seinfeld

Seinfeld features four friends who live in New York City and predominantly hang out at Jerry Seinfeld’s Upper West Side apartment, never traveling to any other boroughs in the city, and rarely mentioning them (Long Island and the Hamptons are really the only places that they even visit) at all. Otherwise, they might as well have created #whitepeopleproblems meme—dealing with such troubling inconveniences as going to the car dealership (to trade in a BMW for a Saab, no less), being assigned to man the coat rack at a party, and of course, having to go out to see a friend’s baby (gross).

2. The O.C.

Set in the heady years of the early and mid-oughts, The O.C. took the formula established by Dawson’s Creek and brought it to one of the most horrifying places in the world: Newport Beach, California. This show is filled with lots of disparaging references to Chino and the “Inland Empire,” which are both “terrible” because they’re poor—obviously—and most episodes involve some kind of gala or other event where trying to find anyone in attendance who’s not white is practically as hard as playing “Where’s Waldo?”.

3. Everybody Loves Raymond

Personified, Everybody Loves Raymond is a quintessentially middle-aged white male: Ray lives with his yelling wife and three kids in Long Island, where he (occasionally) commutes to work as a sportswriter. Most episodes feature him “not understanding women” (including his mother, who’s his neighbor) and making jokes about the problems and “eccentricities” of the domestic life. He also doesn’t really take responsibility for things, which is totally a white thing.

4. Frasier

In Frasier, the successor to Cheers (also a remarkably white show), Dr. Frasier Crane relocates from Boston (the second-whitest city in American) to Seattle (the fifth-whitest), to start a new life after getting a divorce. Once there, he hosts a radio show where he listens to other white people complain about other first-world problems, while dealing with his own first-world problems on the side. Naturally, most of these issues are hashed out over cappuccinos at a coffee shop with his brother Niles (a name so white it barely exists).

5. The Wonder Years

The most serious of the shows on this list, The Wonder Years depicts the life of Kevin Arnold, a typical suburban kid living in 1968-1973 America. Despite its more earnest approach to accurately portraying American life, it’s also very white. Most of the storylines deal with the horrible crises that go along with middle- and high-school life, as well as daddy issues, a hippie sister, and a mean big bro.

7. The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills

Sure, any of the Real Housewives could hold a spot on this list—except for Real Housewives of Atlanta and D.C., of course—but the gals of Beverly Hills really do it… white. Basically all of these women are alcoholics and also hate each other but still hang out for some reason (can’t get whiter than that). To bring this thing full-circle, Camille Donatacci was married to Kelsey Grammer, who played Frasier, and they get separated while the show airs. It’s like “seven degrees of Kevin Bacon,” but with only white people.

8. Friends

A more unrealistic version of Seinfeld, the characters of Friends also rarely interact with the real world, while simultaneously living in a totally unbelievable apartment in Manhattan in their mid-twenties. What proceeds is the embodiment of the new model of friend groups: they all chill together and then occasionally have sex when they’re bored. Other than the drama that ensues from that, nothing really happens.

9. The Nanny

A hoarse Queens native joins an Upper East Side British family as their Nanny and she’s literally the most foreign thing they encounter for the next six seasons. Nanny Fine and Mr. Sheffield’s awkward flirtations (and eventual jump-the-shark marriage) is the recipe for this show that is so white, it’s blinding.

10. Dawson’s Creek

Set in the fictional Capeside, Massachussetts, Dawson’s Creek defined the teenage lives of a generation… perhaps unfortunately. It is the godfather of shows like The O.C. and Gossip Girl, which took the same formula and made it whiter and way richer. In Capeside, all the characters do the classics—sneaking into each other’s bedroom windows via ladder, sleeping with one another, and just hanging out by the water.

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