10 Of The Biggest Internet Purchases Made By Kids

So, no toddler ever accidentally bought a yacht on a landline. Just sayin’. posted on

1. A baby accidentally bought a car in an online auction.

And you thought you had an online shopping problem. 14-month-old Sorella Stoute was tapping around on her dad’s Android device when she made her pop the proud owner of a 1962 Austin-Healey Sprite. In other news, Sorella Stoute knows exactly what she’s getting for her Sweet 16.

2. A kid spent £900 on his virtual farm.

Will Herring / Facebook

A British tyke racked up roughly $1,400 on his mom’s credit card when he got a bit too invested in the well-being of his life on Farmville. Other things you can buy for $1,400:

-An actual horse.
-An actual apple orchard.
-An actual farm.

3. An 11-year-old dropped a grand on an uber-expensive iPhone app.

atomicjeep / Via Flickr: atomicjeep

Next time you hesitate before double-clicking on that dreadfully expensive $3.99 iPhone app, think of young Nick Tucker, who bought an in-depth legal course app called BarMax for a whopping $999. Woof.

4. A little kid almost bought his own harrier jet off eBay.

Not content with just playing with action figures, because you can’t climb inside an action figure and literally fly it to Cuba, a 7-year-old boy tried to buy a real-life Harrier Jump Jet off eBay for $113,515. Thankfully, the Internet Police were able to retract the charge before it was too late, and the kid was forced back into the stifling prison of his imagination.

5. A 5-year-old racked up $2,570 with in-app purchases.

jennycu / Via Flickr: jennycu

Precocious (and hilariously named) youngster Danny Kitchen shocked his folks when he racked up a £1,710 bill (roughly $2,570) on popular zombies-fighting-ninjas game Zombies vs. Ninja. You know what they say: if you can’t take the heat, don’t let your 5-year-old spend your rent money on video games.

6. And a teen accidentally spent $5,600 on phone games.

jb912 / Via Flickr: jb912

According to teenager Cameron Crossan, he only intended to buy a couple of apps in the iTunes store. A few hundred taps and swipes later and he’d spent $5,600 — a sum that ended up getting him turned over to the police by his loving father, Doug, so it could be reported as fraud.

It goes without saying that dinner that night was super awkward.

7. A toddler bought an actual excavator online.

Probably just tired of getting her hands dirty in the sandbox, pint-sized Pipi Quinlan had a brilliant thought: to buy her own piece of hulking construction equipment to expedite the process. The digger, which went for NZ$20,000 (about $16,500 in U.S. currency), was bought when Pipi’s mom happened to leave her computer logged in only a few hours earlier.

8. A teenager tried to buy the original Coke recipe for $15 million.

How much did an unnamed 15-year-old love his Coca-Cola? Enough to bet a staggering $15 million on what was purported to be the original recipe for the famous soft drink. In his defense, think of all the money that could be saved by just making your own Coke! After all, you’ve gotta spend money to make, uh, soda pop.

9. An 8-year-old spent $1,400 on… Smurfberries.

Madison Kay was only in the second grade when she got the brilliant idea to invest $1,400 of her parents’ hard-earned bucks in a bundle of Smurfberries, an invaluable resource in the popular iPhone game Smurfs’ Village. Apple was able to reverse the charges, but everyone’s gonna feel mighty foolish when the U.S. dollar collapses and everyone starts trading exclusively in Smurfberries.

10. And a British teen bought a PlayStation 2. He got something else.

And now, a happy story: A British teenager bought a shiny new PlayStation 2 gaming console online, but when he tore open the packaging, he was met with an…unexpected surprise — £44,000 (about $90,000) in cold, hard cash. His parents turned the package over to the local police, giving the teen the first ever justified use of the phrase “Ugh, my parents are so lame.”

Do you know what your marketing is doing?

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