go to content
Big Stories

The Most Astonishing Stories You Need To Read This Week

This week for BuzzFeed News, Anita Badejo unpacks the complexities of reporting sexual assaults at historically black colleges. Read that and these other great stories from BuzzFeed and around the web.

Posted on

1. Why the Movement Against Campus Sexual Assault Is Leaving Women at Black Colleges Behind — BuzzFeed News

Melissa Golden for BuzzFeed News

For decades, students at Spelman — the elite historically black women’s college — have spoken out about instances of sexual assault committed by students from Morehouse College, their unofficial brother school. Now, in the wake of a petition, protests, and a federal investigation, their messages are ringing louder than ever. Why haven’t we heard them? Read it at BuzzFeed News.

2. The Ballad of Diane Warren — BuzzFeed News

Emily Berl for BuzzFeed News

You may not know Diane Warren’s name, but you’ve belted out a chorus of one of her dozens of megahits at karaoke. With an unexpectedly viral Lady Gaga hit now up for an Oscar, Warren explains to Doree Shafrir how it feels to be in her fourth decade of writing definitive mainstream pop songs without ever quite feeling part of the mainstream. Read it at BuzzFeed News.

3. Who Akai Gurley Was, Before He Was Killed by a Police Officer — BuzzFeed News

Courtesy Kimberly Ballinger

In November 2014, Akai Gurley was shot and killed by a rookie police officer in the stairwell of a Brooklyn housing project. As the officer’s trial begins, Gurley’s family and friends tell Alex Ronan the definitive story of the man they lost. Read it at BuzzFeed News.

4. The Man Who Solved His Own MurderThe Guardian

Natasja Weitsz / Getty Images Contributor

A former Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko was poisoned by a cup of a tea he drank in a London hotel in 2006. Luke Harding traces the astounding events that led Litvinenko to find the man who ultimately killed him — all from his hospital bed. Read it at The Guardian.

5. How Facebook's Plan to Give the World Free Mobile Internet Went so Wrong — BuzzFeed News

Michelle Rial / BuzzFeed News

Alex Kantrowitz chronicles Facebook’s highly controversial, completely audacious, and possibly best-intentioned program, Free Basics. "In short, Facebook’s massive push to bring the world online has hit a wall of activists and government regulators who argue that its free service violates basic principles of an open, free, and fair internet." Read it at BuzzFeed News.

6. The Confessions of R. KellyGQ

Sebastian Kim for GQ

Chris Heath pens the only profile of R. Kelly you will ever need to read. "I wonder whether he's been around so many people for so long who either pretend to believe him, or who simply don't care, that he's learned to take that as evidence of his own innocence." Read it at GQ.

7. Fred Savage Can’t Go Home Again — BuzzFeed News

Scott Council for BuzzFeed NEws

After a 15-year career behind the camera, The Wonder Years star talks to Louis Peitzman about the role that brought him back in front of it and what he learned from playing Kevin Arnold. "Everyone’s saying, ‘Is it so weird going back to acting?' ... It feels like putting on a great pair of jeans." Read it at BuzzFeed News.

8. The Last Days of TargetCanada Business

Johan Hallberg-Campbell for Canada Business

In two grueling years, Target Canada lost billions and put thousands of people out of work. Joe Castaldo discovers what led to the retail giant's difficult rise and colossal fall. “Nobody wanted to be the one to say, ‘This is a disaster.'” Read it at Canada Business.

9. The Tennis Racket — BuzzFeed News

Matt Chase for BuzzFeed News

Betting worth billions. Elite players. Violent threats. Covert messages with Sicilian gamblers. And suspicious matches at Wimbledon. Heidi Blake and John Templon reveal the match-fixing evidence that tennis authorities have kept secret for years. Read it at BuzzFeed News.

Marisa Carroll is the deputy national editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Marisa Carroll at Marisa.Carroll@buzzfeed.com.

Got a confidential tip? Submit it here.