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This Is What People In Red States Think About The Women's March

We sent photographers to marches in Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Nevada to find out what women there had to say.

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Spurred by the #MeToo movement and in solidarity of other causes, women around the country took to the streets Saturday in protest on the anniversary of President Donald Trump's inauguration. We sent photographers to women's marches in Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Utah — all states that Trump won in 2016 — to speak to women about what has mobilized them since the election. Many of the women said they gained a newfound sense of activism after the presidential race and are advocating for change in the 2018 midterms. To hear the women speak for themselves and to see additional viewpoints, check out our videos on Instagram.

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Sarah Pope, 30, at the Austin Women's March. "For so long, women have not been heard and we need to get together and raise our voices so that the things that matter to us start happening."

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Emma Bowman, 29, and her daughter, Norah, 3, at the Women's March in Indianapolis, Indiana. "I brought her today because I want her to have a world where women have equals rights," said Bowman.

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Denise D. Tucker at the Women's March in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. "I’m here today — it’s the right thing to do. I haven’t always had the opportunity to get out and support the community, to support our country, but now is the time," she said.

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Kathy Berryhill (left) at the Women's March in Indianapolis. "Today is important to me because it's just an opportunity for me to sort of be where my feet are and take up space. Everything that proves being a women doesn't mean I'm less than — it's just an opportunity for me to be who I am and still be powerful, so that's why I show up," Berryhill said. Qween Amor (right) in New Orleans. "I'm here to let everyone know that trans women are real women and our rights and our freedoms as individuals need to be respected," Amor said.


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Dottie Moore in Montgomery. "We're here at the Montgomery, Alabama, Women's March once again to fight for women's rights and we are encouraging people to register to vote. We can't have democracy without participation."

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Gabriella Salazar at the Women's March in downtown Sioux Falls: “I came out today because I’m half Hispanic, half white, and I don’t like the things Trump says about my people,” she said.

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Isabella Giardino at the Austin Women's March: "Trump, he's trying to divide us, lower us, but his hate is actually bringing us together. We're here in our diversity to make America great again, with love."

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Gail Adamson, 75, at the Women's March in Indianapolis. "I'm here to protest a government that isn't listening to its own people," Adamson said. "Of course I'm here to protest Trump and the congressional Republicans. I think what we need in government is more respect from people to other people, compromise, listening, getting something done."


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Aviana Maximo (left), Char Green-Maximo (center), and Althea Sanchez (right) in downtown Sioux Falls. "I think that it’s really important that we continue to be supportive of women’s rights and what that really means. I’m also holding a sign for indigenous women's rights. It’s very important to be that backbone and follow up on issues that are still existing for native women and the murdered and missing women as well,” Green-Maximo said.

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Erin Eggleston at the Austin Women's March. "I want to support women who have had abortions. I want to make sure that back-alley abortions never happen again," Eggleston said.

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Denise Atkinson, at the Women's March in Raleigh, said she has long been politically active and took part in demonstrations against the Vietnam War and protests for abortion rights.

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Jennifer Jones, aka "The Dancing Lady of New Orleans": "I stand on the shoulders of greatness and every woman and every man out here represents what is great with humankind." Reflecting on the first Women's March, in January 2017, she added, "It's a year later and we're not as crazy screaming — we're real. We're not new to this. We're true to this."

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"I'm channeling my grandmother today. We only got the right to vote 100 years ago. ... My grandmother was arrested while fighting for the right to vote." said Vicki Lambert, who was with the League of Women Voters at the Women's March in Las Vegas, Nevada.

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Katie Glass of Las Vegas at Women March's "Power to the Polls" rally at Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas: "I'm here to stand up for women. Strong Women change the world."



Kate Bubacz is a Senior Photo Editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Kate Bubacz at kate.bubacz@buzzfeed.com.

Laura is a photo editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in Los Angeles.

Contact Laura Geiser at laura.geiser@buzzfeed.com.

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