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Chinese Olympic Swimmer Fu Yuanhui Shocked Fans By Talking About Her Period

Fu Yuanhui is basically all of us when we're PMSing.

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On Sunday, Fu gave a particularly candid interview and mentioned that she got her period the night before the race.

Gabriel Bouys / AFP / Getty Images

The interview came after her team placed fourth in the 4x100 medley relay.

"I feel like I didn't swim very well today and I want to apologize to my teammates for that," Yuanhui said to the China Central Television reporter. The reporter then commented that Yuanhui seemed to have some stomach pain.

"Actually my period started last night," Fu said. "So I'm feeling pretty weak and really tired."

Alexander Nemenov / AFP / Getty Images

She continued, "But this isn't an excuse. At the end of the day, I just didn't swim very well."

You can watch the full interview with English subtitles here.

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Many women in China only talk about their periods in private. Even then, it's more commonly referred to as "the great aunt" (in Mandarin, "Dà Yímā") or simply "that."

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According to a 2015 survey, only 2% of Chinese women living in China use tampons. And many use little purses to keep them hidden.

That's why Fu's frank remarks were such a revelation. And Chinese fans were quick to applaud Fu for talking about her period so publicly.

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"She is the first athlete to admit getting her period on China Central TV News," read a comment that received over 38,000 likes on Weibo.

Some commenters noted how important it was to dispel the myth that swimming on your period is somehow unsafe or unhygienic.

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“Some science here: women on period can use not only pads but also tampons. For athletes, tampons are used to be put inside bodies to prevent water and infection, while menstruation will be kept inside,” read one comment.

Just to clarify: It's totally safe to swim while on your period.

It's not gross or unhygienic — especially if you're wearing a tampon or menstrual cup. And there is no evidence to suggest that it's dangerous.

Casey Gueren is a senior health editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Casey Gueren at casey.gueren@buzzfeed.com.

Beimeng Fu is a BuzzFeed News World Reporter covering China and is based in New York.

Contact Beimeng Fu at beimeng.fu@buzzfeed.com.

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