Shipwrecked Costa Concordia Upright After 19-Hour Operation Off Italy

Engineers declared the 114,000-ton Costa Concordia cruise ship completely upright on Tuesday after an operation to pull it from its side where it capsized in January 2012. Thirty-two people died last year when the ship, with 4,200 passengers onboard, hit rocks and ran aground off the island of Giglio.

The parbuckling operation to raise the stricken Costa Concordia continues on September 16, 2013 in Isola del Giglio, Italy. cache.daylife.com

Salvage workers worked to raise the cruise ship in the largest and most expensive maritime salvage operation in history. Using the technique called parbuckling, the ship was rotated by a series of cables and hydraulic machines.

The wreck of Italy’s Costa Concordia cruise ship begins to emerge from water on September 17, 2013 near the harbour of Giglio Porto. cache.daylife.com

There was many obstacles the crews faced, starting with a storm that postponed the operation.

Early on Monday, crews lifted it from a rock shelf, and then engineers hit the tipping point they were awaiting after 15 hours of slower-than-expected progress.

The wreck of Italy’s Costa Concordia cruise ship begins to emerge from water on September 17, 2013 near the harbour of Giglio Porto. cache.daylife.com

This is the first time such a massive cruise ship has been righted. The damaged Costa Concordia will now be towed away and scrapped.

The wreck of Italy’s Costa Concordia cruise ship begins to emerge from water on September 17, 2013 near the harbour of Giglio Porto. cache.daylife.com

The Costa Concordia is seen after it was lifted upright early Tuesday. AP

The crippled cruise ship appeared to be covered in mud and rust after being righted. AP

Time lapse of the ship being pulled from the water:

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