Obama Administration Stalls Response To Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Act

“Delay is putting lives at risk,” said Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin.

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin Todd Franson/HRC / Via s3.amazonaws.com

The Obama administration has delayed action in adjusting aid to Uganda in response to passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act, even though an interagency review process put forward recommendations some weeks ago.

Sources familiar with the review process, which the administration announced just after Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed the anti-gay bill into law in February, told BuzzFeed they have expected an announcement from the United States government for some time because the recommendations were pending, but the White House has been silent.

This inaction follows a seemingly contradictory series of announcements in March. The White House announced an adjustment of around $10 million — including a cut to a religious organization that vocally supported the law — out of the more than $700 million that the U.S. gives to Uganda annually on March 23 because of the new law. But days later, the U.S. embassy in Kampala issued a press release saying “No Changes in U.S. Assistance to Uganda.” And the initial cuts were announced on the same night as the administration said it would send military helicopters much coveted by President Museveni to assist in the hunt for rebel leader Joseph Kony.

As the review has dragged on, American LGBT and public health advocates have grown increasingly frustrated by the White House, which they say has frozen them out of consultations over responding to the law. The administration has increasingly held back details on what options are under consideration and when they might come.

“They haven’t been telling us anything concrete,” one told BuzzFeed.

On Tuesday, Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin publicly called out President Obama for his inaction in a letter that said the “delay is putting lives at risk.”

“More than three months since the enactment of this law, I respectfully ask
that you direct the Administration’s interagency review to begin issuing immediate, concrete results that will illustrate the United States’s commitment to protecting human rights in Uganda,” Griffin wrote. “President Museveni must understand that there will be continuing and long term political and economic consequences to state-driven homophobia.”

Griffin also called for expanding the review to include other countries that have recently enacted “heinous anti-LGBT laws” — Nigeria, Russia, and Brunei — in order to “signal to the world that these consequences are not directed solely towards Africa.”

National Security Council spokesman Patrick Ventrell would not comment on why the administration had not made a final decision on the recommendations from the interagency review process. However, he avoided referencing the review in a statement responding to the Human Rights Campaign’s letter.

“In response to President Museveni’s decision to assent to the Anti-Homosexuality Act, the United States took immediate steps to demonstrate our support for the LGBT community in Uganda, deter other countries from enacting similar laws, and reinforce our commitment to the promotion and defense of human rights for all people – including LGBT individuals,” Ventrell wrote. “As we move forward, we will take additional steps to demonstrate our opposition to the Act and our support for LGBT persons in Uganda and around the world—recognizing that the struggle to end discrimination against LGBT persons is a global challenge, and one that is central to the United States commitment to promoting human rights.”

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