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The True Story Behind The Melted-Duck-On-Dashboard Tweet Is Wonderfully Satisfying

Mystery solved.

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On Wednesday, Twitter user @shiohitoshi shared two photos with the caption "This really sucks."

The pictures appeared to show a green plastic duck melting on a car dashboard. People loved the tweet, and it's been retweeted over 600,000 times.

me at the slightest inconvenience https://t.co/cET1Q910Zk

when he calls me princess https://t.co/dQ7K3KYxQd

This is a physical representation of how it feels to get turned down https://t.co/TqjdXDYTem

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It even became a meme.

Every time we touch, I get this feeling And every time we kiss, I swear I could fly https://t.co/r9UW3C8LmH

me with any minor inconvenience https://t.co/aQjmC2AJy9

However, soon after the tweet got big, people started pointing out what they saw were inconsistencies in the two pictures.

@shiohitoshi 失礼します。別物って言う人にはこう見えてるかも。③は垂直かな…答え合わせほしいです

"Maybe for those who say they’re different, they might be seeing it like this. Number 3 must be vertical… I want to check answers."

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People thought the photos may have been faked, or that they were of two different cars.

"How about this?"

What was going on here?

@GS_tyobi @shiohitoshi ①同じ物が置いてある ②同じ物 ③同じ並びにボタンが並んでいる ④光の加減をご存知? ここまで見て違う車と思ったなら病院おすすめします。

BuzzFeed News reached out to @shiohitoshi to clarify whether the images are real and to ask what the response has been like. He said that he has been shocked by the virality.

"I didn't think it would spread this much," said @shiohitoshi, a student at an art university living in Ishikawa.

He said that the photo was real, and that the duck was won by a fellow student. The second image occurred after he left it in his car for a week.

"I was sad when it melted, so I thought I would just get some likes from friends," he said. "Honestly, I keep thinking, Is this really that interesting of a tweet? At the same time, if it's able to make people chuckle a bit, I'm happy."

He even posted a video to counter tweets saying the photos are fake.

Rachael Krishna is a reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in London.

Contact Rachael Krishna at rachael.krishna@buzzfeed.com.

Contact Kota Hatachi at Kota.Hatachi@buzzfeed.com.

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