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Inside The Lives Of The Wives And Widows Of ISIS

"Even my baby girl goes to bed with her gun." Arranged marriages, slave maids, and militant babies: Photos posted to the Twitter accounts of women claiming to be members of ISIS provide a glimpse into the world of female jihadis.

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Even as Twitter tries to delete accounts associated with ISIS, women claiming to be members of the group continue to use the platform as both a recruiting tool and a support group, providing outsiders with a unique glimpse into the everyday lives of female jihadis.

Six months after its initial investigation, BuzzFeed News takes another look at the women who travel to Syria and join ISIS. Some are new mothers, many are widows, and others have died.

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Other accounts appearing to belong to women who have joined ISIS have also gone silent for months at a time, such as the one belonging to "Umm Nosaybah," which hadn't posted anything since November until after the publication of this story.

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A man claiming to be an ISIS fighter posted this image of a newborn child, with the caption, "The Little Terrorist #Hammam was born in the land of the caliphate, I ask God Almighty to make him one of the Caliphate's soldiers."

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Since so many ISIS members use social media, it's possible to track a relationship from marriage to "martyrdom." This can be seen through the accounts of "Umm Abdullatif" and her now-dead husband "Abu Abdullatif."

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They both (separately) left their homes and families in Melbourne to travel to Syria, Abdullatif in July and Duman in November.