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Which Of These 5 Women Artists Are You? (Part Two)

For Women's History Month, find out which one of these five women artists you are the most like!

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  1. Shades of Black: Onyx, Ebony, Charcoal, Jet
    Shades of Black: Onyx, Ebony, Charcoal, Jet
    Glacial Blue
    Glacial Blue
    Greenery
    Greenery
    Marble White
    Marble White
    Crimson
    Crimson
  2. Committed
    Ironic
    Daring
    Dramatic
    Professional
  3. Small dogs because they are a symbol of wealth and fidelity
    Via NMWA
    Small dogs because they are a symbol of wealth and fidelity
    Any animal with a furry coat
    Via NMWA
    Any animal with a furry coat
    Any animal that can strike a pose
    Via NMWA
    Any animal that can strike a pose
    Cows because I use their manure in firing ceramics
    Via NMWA
    Cows because I use their manure in firing ceramics
    I can’t choose between my wolf, my cheetah, and my six chameleons
    Via NMWA
    I can’t choose between my wolf, my cheetah, and my six chameleons
  4. Artwork portraying real or imagined people because I’m an extrovert
    Photography because I’m addicted to Instagram
    Larger-than-life portraiture
    Artwork from a different time and place because I have wanderlust
    Mixed-media mashups
  5. Monochrome
    Monochrome
    Pantsuit
    Pantsuit
    Something revealing
    Something revealing
    Haute couture
    Haute couture
    Anything vintage
    Anything vintage
  6. The seat of government in a capital city
    A hipster haven
    Any spot where I can enjoy wide open vistas
    Don’t care as long as it’s in the European Union
    Italy

Which Of These 5 Women Artists Are You? (Part Two)

You got: Lavinia Fontana (1552–1614)

You are Renaissance painter Lavinia Fontana! You are regarded as the first professional woman artist. For 20 years beginning in the 1580s, you were the portraitist of choice among Bolognese noblewomen. You also gave birth to 11 children! Learn more about the artist here: http://ow.ly/l9va30aj12N

Lavinia Fontana (1552–1614)
Lavinia Fontana, Portrait of a Noblewoman, ca. 1580; Oil on canvas, 45 1/4 x 35 1/4 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay
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You got: Sarah Bernhardt (1844–1923)

You are best known as one of the most famous actresses of the 19th-century stage. Less well known is your skill as a sculptor! You sold your work to purchase an exotic menagerie of animals that you kept within the walled garden of your home. Learn more about the artist here: http://ow.ly/N3qI30aj3ir

Sarah Bernhardt (1844–1923)
Sarah Bernhardt, Après la tempête (After the Storm), ca. 1876; White marble, 29 1/2 x 24 x 23 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay
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You got: Sonya Clark (b. 1967)

As a textile artist, you interweave craft, history, and race to create mixed-media works that celebrate blackness and address racial tensions and stereotypes. You’ve studied with craftspeople from around the globe. In your work “Afro Abe II” (2012), you transformed a U.S. five-dollar bill to reveal connections between money, power, and pride. Learn more about the artist here: http://ow.ly/S2Su30aj3dO

Sonya Clark (b. 1967)
Sonya Clark, Afro Abe II, 2012; $5 dollar bill and hand-embroidered thread, 4 x 6 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Heather and Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, DC; © Sonya Y.S. Clark Class: Visual Works
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You got: Daniela Rossell (b. 1973)

You creatively capture the lifestyle of the elite through your photographic collaborations. You grew up as a member of Mexico’s upper class and surrounded by fine art. Your best-known images are part of your “Ricas y Famosas” series featuring members of Mexico’s elite in their homes. Learn more about the artist here: http://ow.ly/OhxW30aj37D

Daniela Rossell (b. 1973)
Daniela Rossell, Medusa (Ricas y Famosas), 1999; Chromogenic color print, 60 x 50 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Heather and Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, DC; © 1999 Daniela Rossell, Courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, Ne
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You got: Maria Martinez (1887–1980)

For more than eight decades, you continued and extended the centuries-old pottery traditions of San Ildefonso Pueblo in northern New Mexico. You and your husband revived an ancient local process for making all-black pottery. Learn more about the artist here: http://ow.ly/NSr630aj330

Maria Martinez (1887–1980)
Maria Martinez, Jar, ca. 1939; Blackware, 11 1/8 x 13 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay
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