were54
SHARE THIS PAGE View Viral Dashboard ›
    • were54

      I need you all to know that this week I broke my months of houseboundedness (due to an illness) in the singular pursuit of a sweet potato pie. My town is overwhelmingly white, and I was unable to travel too far, so I was unsuccessful in my search. Not to make the effort worth nothing, I clomped my little invalid self over to a farmstand and bought a giant sweet potato, which I then painstakingly turned into a pie from scratch over the course of a day. I took frequent breaks, but got back up every time because I just had to have some pie. Took some time and a great deal of effort, but I am now eating pie as I write this, and I could not be happier. TL;DR: FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS. SWEET POTATO PIE HEALS. PRAISE BE.

    • were54

      Do we even know that Snape’s memories were wholly accurate? Many of them were decades old, and everyone’s memories tend to warp with time to make themselves the hero or victim. Are we sure that he is a reliable narrator? I somehow doubt that Harry’s mother, if she was so wonderful, would have ended up with such a complete douche. Not to mention that, in the move just before, it is revealed that Slughorn messed with his memories in order to make himself look better….

    • were54

      Second pro-tip: If you are going to buy a hardcover textbook, it is best to do so at the end of the semester, when everyone else is trying to offload their books and, thus, flooding the market. By simple supply vs. demand, the books will be cheaper in this “buyer’s market”. You will need to do some legwork, though, to find out from professors what books they are planning to assign.  Use this principal when selling books, as well - hold off on selling this semester’s books until the start of the next semester or next school year. (This does not take into account the issue of new editions popping up between when you bought the book and when you sell it). If you want to hold on to your textbooks, just sell your current textbook once you are done with it and buy an earlier edition, You won’t have to worry about the problems or page numbers when you are done with the class. As an engineer, I have even found that much older textbooks are often better than newer textbooks for well-established subjects, like statics and mathematics. They tend to be more compact, better written, and far less “busy” with distracting graphics and colors.

    • were54

      Pro-tip: Dumpster dive outside of dorms on the last day of exams, or whenever the dorms clear out. Especially good to do at “rich kid” schools, where people are more likely to throw textbooks away. (Yes, people do this). Then, wait until the first week of the next school year to sell those textbooks in a seller’s market. Also? Stay until the last possible minute at your own dorm (if you are living on campus) and troll through the hallways for stuff that people leave outside of their rooms as “trash” because they can’t be bothered to bring it with them. Since these items are last-minute abandonments, they are likely nicer than the items that were thrown away. I outfitted my first apartment for free this way - furniture, mirrors, a vacuum cleaner…even brand new clothes with tags still attached and giant unopened bulk boxes of snacks, like granola bars.  Rich kids, man…

    • were54

      This is too familiar. On my end, I estimate that it took me 6-7 years to get a diagnosis. I went from considering joining MENSA, to suddenly being unable to perform basic math. I went from running a wilderness camp to barely being able to lift my head. I eat and eat, popping vitamin after vitamin, and still can’t seem to get any energy. I’ve had so many tests, and seen so many shrugged shoulders under white lab coats. I’ve been dumped by a psychiatrist, too. She could not figure out what was wrong with me, and I kept missing and mixing up my appointments. Then, the muscle twitching, week-long migraines, blurry vision, and shooting pains kicked in, and I could no longer blame myself for my symptoms. It felt like I had suddenly aged 50 years. I finally saw an LLMD on a relative’s suggestion that I “revisit lyme”. (Lyme was the first thing that doctors would check me for, but they would always tell me that I did not have it). Ends up that I have multiple nasty co-infections. Looking back, I was a pretty classic case and have had many chances for exposure to tick bites. It’s so sad that it has gotten to this point but, considering how long I went untreated, I am very lucky that it did not progress more quickly.

    • were54

      That when I’m telling you that my biggest problem at work is endemic discrimination and bias, and ask for a woman-led discussion with HR and management on the topic, that you assume that it’s actually the physical environment taking a toll and that I just need some days off to “calm down”. What you are assuming here is that I am the one who is not cut out for the job. My actual problem is that my crew does not understand what a woman with authority and intelligence looks like, nor how to interact with one, and *no* it is not the same as what every young man in my position faces, because I am not that young….men just don’t know how to discern my age because this PPE is too big and I don’t have a beard. Also, FYI, things are haywire because the service providers and client would rather talk to a man than talk to me, because they assume that I don’t know what I am talking about, so they just ignore me and everything that I say, and either go *under* me to speak with a lesser crewmember or else make random assumptions rather than talk to me.  Also, when I am talking to HR and management about how men constantly talk over me and don’t let me finish my sentences, it would be helpful if they actually let me finish my sentences….

    • were54

      Um…yes it does; time does exist. The MEASUREMENT of time is a human invention, but time definitely exists and has existed for long before humans did. Think of it this way: just because humans decided to measure weight in pounds, stones, and kilos, does not mean that mass and gravity did not exist before humans came around. Another way to look at it is that animals age and locomote (make changes in position over time) without have a human definition of time, per se. (It can be argued that circadian rhythms govern the notion of time for both human and non-human animals, but that’s just a whole other level of reasoning as to why you are incorrect; the common human macro-measurement of time is based off of the movement of celestial objects that were around far before we ever were!) One thing that you may be trying to get at, and with which I agree, is that the human experience of time can be molded and adapted. I remember reading somewhere that, whereas people in countries like the U.S. tend to divide up their time in something like 1 or 5 minute segments, people in other countries (less developed ones, I believe) tended to think of time in segments of 15-minutes or more. E.g., one’s definition of a “moment” may be dependent upon one’s cultural upbringing. Also, obviously, being removed from access to sunlight, or having one’s rhythms forcibly changed (jet lag, shift work, etc.) can also alter how one’s body and mind perceive and work with time.

    • were54

      How about: “What are you doing here?” when someone sees me AT WORK, DOING MY JOB (male dom field). This gets asked of me at least once a week. Sometimes it’s “How the hell did you end up here?”, “What do you think that you are doing?”, “Wouldn’t you rather be in the office?”, “Why are they making you do this?”, or “Doesn’t your husband make enough money?” I wish that I could just work without having to constantly defend my presence. “Why don’t you just let the men handle that?”, followed immediately by “Why are you offended by that? I was just worried about your safety.” Again, while I am at work, doing the damn job that I am being paid for. If that original question were ever said to any man, don’t tell me that it wouldn’t be automatically perceived as an insult? “Why don’t you bring us some cookies tomorrow?”… “What do you mean, you don’t bake cookies? Aren’t you married?” The number one: “Why didn’t you take your spouses name?” Sometimes I ask this of men, just to even things out, but it is usually taken with confusion, laughter, or even anger as if I was trying to insult their masculinity. To all of the people saying that men must get asked these things too, understand that the point is that not only are women asked these things annoyingly often, but we are forced to answer them as if they are genuine questions, and we are not allowed to be insulted. (No, no one is pointing a gun to my head, but I may be ostracized, beaten up, or have my my career chances ruined).  Consider this: my husband works in a female dominated field. He concurs that, although he definitely feels the effects of the patriarchy, he also recognizes that he does not have it anywhere near as bad. When people ask him why he chose his field, it is always with respect and not indignance - for instance, he is constantly told “I’m so glad to see a man here!” and “We need more men in [his field]”, and I have never ONCE been told that we need more women in my field. No one has ever been happy to see me show up to work in their crew - most people either just grumble, throw me shade, or pretend like I’m not there (give me no work assignments). To be clear, these are people that have never met me before. The only thing that they know about me is my name and gender. For him, he has to fight off promotions and is constantly embarrassed by the obvious preferential treatment that he receives, whereas I have to fight for every bone, and I still get the “well, we’ll see” treatment.

    • were54

      I had very long, “Disney Princess” hair my whole life until last year, when I cut it into a dramatic “butch” pixie. I have received every one of the reactions on this list. The ones that were really telling were the “but men like long hair” comments. Or else, “but, I loved your long hair!”. I’m married and my husband likes my short hair. Why should I care if you or any other men find me attractive? Is that really all that I am worth? I have, personally, never felt more beautiful in my life. That’s really all that matters! My husband loves the short hair because he loves me and he can see that I’m just happier with the short hair (his words). For the first time in my whole life, I feel like I am really seeing ME when I look in the mirror. And I wouldn’t mind being mistaken for a man, considering how much easier that would make things in my line of work. The skirt, high heels, high voice, and giant boobs are a dead give away, though…

Load More
Loading...