back to top
Politics

Here’s Some Of The Misinformation You Might See Being Shared On Polling Day

Relax, it's all going to plan.

Posted on

Take a pen with you to the polling station. Don't risk it. #EUref

Advertisement

The theory that you should use pens rather than pencils to avoid your vote being erased dates back to pro-independence voters in the 2014 Scottish independence referendum, and was adopted by Leave voters in the 2016 European referendum.

You can use a pen if you like. But there is no evidence to suggest it will protect you from fraud. Last year Jordan Lawrence from the Electoral Commission told the Daily Mirror: "The use of pencils does not in itself increase the likelihood of electoral fraud: while pencil marks can be rubbed out, similarly, pen marks can be crossed out."

2. You'll probably see some footage of behaviour at counts that suggests irregularities are taking place: Here's an example from the Scottish independence referendum.

View this video on YouTube

youtube.com

This footage was later explained by a spokesperson for the chief counting officer, and even the Yes campaign urged voters not to worry.

To clarify, ballot papers have not yet been sorted into Yes/No and are just resting on table where No will go once sorted. No need to worry.

4. People will probably freak out over behaviour outside polling stations.

Specifically, volunteers from various parties asking for people's names. But in fact it's totally legal for them to do this: It's so they can feed it back to canvassers running turnout operations.

5. In the early hours of the morning, some people will likely think that Labour is nailed on to win the election due to the number of seats it's won. However, whatever the final result, it will almost certainly look good for the party in the first few hours due to the number of safe Labour seats that are announced first.

Victoria Sanusi is a reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in London.

Contact Victoria Sanusi at victoria.sanusi@buzzfeed.com.

Jim Waterson is a politics editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in London.

Contact Jim Waterson at jim.waterson@buzzfeed.com.

Got a confidential tip? Submit it here.

Promoted