9 Charts That Show How The UK Would Change Without Scotland

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Politics

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Labour would be hit hardest if Scottish MPs were removed from Westminster, losing 40 of its current 257 MPs. The Liberal Democrats would lose 11 of 56, while the Conservatives would lose just one of 305 – enough to produce a clear Conservative majority in this parliament without the need for a coalition with the Lib Dems.

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Labour would be hit hardest if Scottish MPs were removed from Westminster, losing 40 of its current 257 MPs. The Liberal Democrats would lose 11 of 56, while the Conservatives would lose just one of 305 – enough to produce a clear Conservative majority in this parliament without the need for a coalition with the Lib Dems.

← Slide →
Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Labour would be hit hardest if Scottish MPs were removed from Westminster, losing 40 of its current 257 MPs. The Liberal Democrats would lose 11 of 56, while the Conservatives would lose just one of 305 – enough to produce a clear Conservative majority in this parliament without the need for a coalition with the Lib Dems.

The economy

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed / Via Source: scotland.gov.uk

Trying to work out how to divide up the British economy has been one of the most controversial aspects of the referendum campaign – especially the question of what proportion of North Sea oil revenues Scotland will get, and how much those revenues are likely to be in the future.

As such, this chart isn't definitive, but the proportions give you a sense of the scale. The black area represents the difference between keeping North Sea oil and gas revenue nominally part of the UK's GDP and giving Scotland a geographical share of it (i.e. Scotland getting all the revenue from oil produced in Scottish waters).

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed / Via Source: scotland.gov.uk

Trying to work out how to divide up the British economy has been one of the most controversial aspects of the referendum campaign – especially the question of what proportion of North Sea oil revenues Scotland will get, and how much those revenues are likely to be in the future.

As such, this chart isn't definitive, but the proportions give you a sense of the scale. The black area represents the difference between keeping North Sea oil and gas revenue nominally part of the UK's GDP and giving Scotland a geographical share of it (i.e. Scotland getting all the revenue from oil produced in Scottish waters).

← Slide →
Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed / Via Source: scotland.gov.uk

Trying to work out how to divide up the British economy has been one of the most controversial aspects of the referendum campaign – especially the question of what proportion of North Sea oil revenues Scotland will get, and how much those revenues are likely to be in the future.

As such, this chart isn't definitive, but the proportions give you a sense of the scale. The black area represents the difference between keeping North Sea oil and gas revenue nominally part of the UK's GDP and giving Scotland a geographical share of it (i.e. Scotland getting all the revenue from oil produced in Scottish waters).

The Eurovision Song Contest

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

The UK's glorious history in Eurovision would be reduced by a crushing 20%.

The Olympics

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

In the 2012 Olympics, individual Scottish competitors won two gold medals (Andy Murray and Sir Chris Hoy) and one silver (swimmer Michael Jamieson). Ten medals went to UK teams that included Scottish athletes (five gold, three silver, and two bronze) – and how they would have fared as separate Scottish and Rest of UK teams is unclear. Athletes from the rest of the UK won 22 golds, 13 silvers, and 17 bronze medals without any Scottish athletes being involved.

If you exclude all mixed team medals, Rest of UK would have placed fourth in the medal table (slipping one place, behind Russia), while Scotland would have placed 36th, just behind Norway.

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

In the 2012 Olympics, individual Scottish competitors won two gold medals (Andy Murray and Sir Chris Hoy) and one silver (swimmer Michael Jamieson). Ten medals went to UK teams that included Scottish athletes (five gold, three silver, and two bronze) – and how they would have fared as separate Scottish and Rest of UK teams is unclear. Athletes from the rest of the UK won 22 golds, 13 silvers, and 17 bronze medals without any Scottish athletes being involved.

If you exclude all mixed team medals, Rest of UK would have placed fourth in the medal table (slipping one place, behind Russia), while Scotland would have placed 36th, just behind Norway.

← Slide →
Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

In the 2012 Olympics, individual Scottish competitors won two gold medals (Andy Murray and Sir Chris Hoy) and one silver (swimmer Michael Jamieson). Ten medals went to UK teams that included Scottish athletes (five gold, three silver, and two bronze) – and how they would have fared as separate Scottish and Rest of UK teams is unclear. Athletes from the rest of the UK won 22 golds, 13 silvers, and 17 bronze medals without any Scottish athletes being involved.

If you exclude all mixed team medals, Rest of UK would have placed fourth in the medal table (slipping one place, behind Russia), while Scotland would have placed 36th, just behind Norway.

Soft drinks

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed / Via gov.uk

Scottish households buy a lot more soft drinks than the rest of the UK (2,027ml per week on average, compared to 1,616ml per week in England). But removing them only changes the UK average very slightly, because there are way more English people there than anyone else.

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed / Via gov.uk

Scottish households buy a lot more soft drinks than the rest of the UK (2,027ml per week on average, compared to 1,616ml per week in England). But removing them only changes the UK average very slightly, because there are way more English people there than anyone else.

← Slide →
Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed / Via gov.uk

Scottish households buy a lot more soft drinks than the rest of the UK (2,027ml per week on average, compared to 1,616ml per week in England). But removing them only changes the UK average very slightly, because there are way more English people there than anyone else.

The size of the country

Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Scotland accounts for around 32% of the UK's total surface area. A Scotland-free UK would be much smaller...

...as you can see here.

Digital Vision/Thinkstock/Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Please note: There are no plans under the current independence proposals to actually physically remove Scotland from the British landmass. (Also: Ireland still exists.)

Digital Vision/Thinkstock/Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Please note: There are no plans under the current independence proposals to actually physically remove Scotland from the British landmass. (Also: Ireland still exists.)

← Slide →
Digital Vision/Thinkstock/Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

Please note: There are no plans under the current independence proposals to actually physically remove Scotland from the British landmass. (Also: Ireland still exists.)