18 Maps That Will Change How You See The World

Including some disturbing news for America.

1. A map showing homicide rates around the world.

UN Office on Drugs and Crime / Via imgur.com

2. A map of how common blonde hair is around the world.

Schrodinger-Excidium, Deviantart / Via schrodinger-excidium.deviantart.com

3. A map drawn in imperial Japan in 1853, centring on Tokyo.

Suido Nakajima / Via imgur.com

4. A map of the world in 43 AD: a reprint of one drawn by Pomponius Mela, a Roman scholar credited as the father of geography.

Wikimedia Commons / Konrad Miller / Pomponius Mela / Via en.wikipedia.org

Reconstructed in 1898 by Konrad Miller.

5. A map showing how the official time and the solar time differs around the world.

“Solar time vs standard time” by Stefano Maggiolo. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons / Via blog.poormansmath.net

Taken from Stefano Maggiolo’s fascinating blog.

6. A map showing every city in the world with more than 100,000 inhabitants.

Nokia / CartoDB / Via imgur.com

There are 4,037 of them.

7. Relatedly, a map showing the population density around the world.

NASA Earth Observatory / Via neo.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov

8. Sticking with population: This is how big each country would be if it were in proportion with its population.

Worldmapper / Via worldmapper.org

9. A map of the world as seen by the Ottoman Empire in 1803.

Ottoman Military Engineering School [Tab’hane-yi Hümayun] / Via imgur.com

From the Cedid Atlas Tercümesi (The New Great Atlas).

10. A map of the prevailing religions in countries around the world.

“Prevailing world religions map” by LilTeK21 at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Which, annoyingly, doesn’t include “no religion” (which would be the biggest single group in much of Europe), but still.

11. A map of the world from 1154.

“TabulaRogeriana upside-down” by TabulaRogeriana.jpg: Al-Idrisiderivative work: PHGCOM (talk) - TabulaRogeriana.jpg. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons. / Via en.wikipedia.org

Drawn by the Arabic cartographer Mohammed Idrisi, from the Tabula Rogeriana (Book of Roger).

12. A map showing where you’d end up if you dug straight down to the other side of the Earth.

Distractify / Via imgur.com

Assuming you could find a way not to be crushed and burned to death on the way, of course.

13. The Mercator projection, 1569.

Gerardus Mercator / Via en.wikipedia.org

The first and most famous “projection” of a spherical globe onto a flat map, giving sailors accurate lines of longitude and latitude.

14. A map showing the most popular sports around the world.

Quora / Via imgur.com

15. The Ortelius World Map (1564), the first map by Abraham Ortelius, creator of the first modern atlas.

“OrteliusWorldMap1570” by Abraham Ortelius - The Library of Congress. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons / Via commons.wikimedia.org

The Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570, was a collection of 53 maps.

16. A map showing countries by number of internet users.

“InternetPopulation2011 DeSabbata Graham OII” by Stefano De Sabbata and Mark Graham - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons / Via commons.wikimedia.org

17. A map of the most popular website in each country.

By the data nerds at webempires.org.

18. A map showing the results of a survey asking the world who they see as the biggest threat to world peace.

WIN/Gallup International/YouTube / Via youtube.com

People are pretty scared of America, it turns out.

BuzzFeed is attempting to track down and embed all the original creators featured in this article. Please contact tom.chivers@buzzfeed.com.

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Tom Chivers is a science writer for BuzzFeed and is based in London.
 
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