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Is This London Or Abroad?

Think London’s one big concrete jungle? Think again. The city’s mishmash of cultures have created something much more interesting. Transport for London asks can you spot the real London?

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    Graham Higgs/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: ghiggs
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    London
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    London!

    This is Little Venice in Maida Vale, London: a gaggle of canal boats, restaurants, museums and the Canal Café Theatre: the perfect place for a stroll down to Camden Lock.

    London!
    Tea, two sugars / Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: mysnapps
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    Lucie Focus/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: lucifocus
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    This is in China Town, New York. Though we do have our own China Town in Leicester Square (pictured): a wealth of pagodas, lights, lanterns and Asian restaurants emitting mouth-watering smells. For a date idea with a difference, take a walk under the twinkling lights (armed with a bag of dumplings) and stop into the Chinese supermarket to stock up on Asian sweeties.

    Simon and his camer/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: simon__syon
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    Mike T/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: fallstreak_holes
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    This is St Dunstan in the East, a hidden walled garden between Monument and Tower Hill stations. This former church was built in 1100 and was improved by the handiwork of renowned architect Sir Christopher Wren in 1695. Though it survived the Great Fire Of London the church was sadly badly hit during the 1941 Blitz. It was reopened as a public garden in 1971 and is the perfect place for an afternoon sandwich or a respite from the hustle and bustle of the city.

    Matt Brown/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: londonmatt
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    clive darra/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: fsse-info
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    This is London - more specifically, the Emirates Air Line cable car, a gondola lift link across the Thames between the Greenwich Peninsula and the Royal Docks. The views of the city are nothing short of spectacular: so make sure you travel off-peak for the 10 minute version - it speeds up to a five minute ride during rush hour to help weary commuters get to their destination in a hurry.

    Ed Webster/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: ed_webster
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    CGP Grey/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0)/CGPGrey.com / Via Flickr: cgpgrey
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    This is the BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir aka Neasden Temple. Neasden Temple is a picturesque Hindu temple in Brent, northwest London. It cost over £12million to build and was the largest temple outside of India for many years. The temple is open to people of all faiths and backgrounds, all year round, and special tours can be booked here.

    CGP Grey/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0)/CGPGrey.com / Via Flickr: cgpgrey
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    George Rex/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: rogersg
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    This is London's Serpentine Gallery: two contemporary art galleries, linked by the bridge over the Serpentine Lake, in Hyde Park. A temporary summer pavilion is designed for the gallery by a leading architect each year. This year's pavilion (which has been affectionately likened to a glorious UFO or a jellyfish) was designed by Chilean architect Smiljan Radić.

    Matt Brown/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: londonmatt
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    jans canon/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: 43158397@N02
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    These wild beasts are St James's Park's famous resident pelicans. They are rather friendly, and despite the signs asking you not to feed them, will happily join you on a bench and attempt to snaffle your lunch! If that fails, they've been spotted sneaking into London Zoo and helping themselves to fish!

    Franklin Hunting/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: franklin_hunting
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    Brent Ozar/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: brento
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    This is St Isaac's in St Petersburg, the dome of which was inspired by Christopher Wren's dome on top of St Paul's Cathedral, London (pictured below). The original church was built in 604 a.d, but the St Paul's you see before you, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, wasn't finished until 1710. A bit of spooky trivia: there are roughly 200 people buried in St Paul's including Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, the poet John Donne and Sir Christopher Wren himself. St Paul's Cathedral became the most visited in the country after Prince Charles married Lady Diana Spencer there on 2 July 1981.

    Garry Knight/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: garryknight
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    Rictor Norton & David Allen/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0)
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    Abroad
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    This gothic castle is Strawberry Hill House situated in Twickenham, London. It was built by Horace Walpole in the 1700s and its eerily beautiful walls inspired the first gothic novel The Castle of Otranto. Strawberry Hill House is only a hop, skip and a jump from Alexander Pope's Grotto, the last remaining part of his 1720-built villa and Twickenham riverside - which is the perfect place for picnics. If you walk along the riverside for approximately twenty minutes you'll walk past the infamous Eel Pie Island: a private artists' community that opens itself to the public several times a year, and find yourself at York House where you can pop in and see the Naked Ladies. Don't worry - they are statues!

    Rictor Norton & David Allen/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0)
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    Andrew Bowden/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: bods
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    If you guessed London you were correct: this is the Peace Pagoda in Battersea Park. The Peace Pagoda hosts many Buddhists festivals, celebrations and activities from June to August. The padoga and the surrounding Victorian gardens also makes a beautiful walk in the winter when it is crisp with frost and snow.

    Jim Linwood/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: brighton
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    David Rush/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: dcr1138
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    These dinosaurs are not Londoners: they are relics from Spreepark, an abandoned theme park in Germany. However, London is not completely devoid of dino-friends: the picture below is of the Crystal Palace Dinosaurs. Despite their youthful looks, these toothsome beasts were first unveiled in 1854 and were the first dinosaur sculptures in the world! They're so old that their launch pre-dated Charles Darwin's infamous book, On the Origin of Species, by six years.

    Jim Linwood/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: brighton
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    Faric/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: tromal
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    While you might not be able to make it to Saint Michel Market, France, London's most famous flower market, Columbia Road Flower Market in E2, is a wonderful place to spend a Sunday. Once you've strolled along the market, stopped into one of the infamous tea, coffee and cake shops, and picked up some floral bargains you can take a short stroll to BOXPARK next to Shoredtich High Street: a collection of pop-up shops, cafes, bars and restaurants.

    Lee-Anne Inglis/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: beatrixrose
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    Michael Gallagher/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: michaelgallagher
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    This picturesque view is of St Katharine Docks, just next to Tower Bridge, London. The docks are so popular that the Queen is rumoured to moor her yacht here. The docks are packed with restaurants, cafes and bars: so ideal for a tasty meal or just a stroll to take in the sights and sounds. Especially if you go at night and it is illuminated by dozens of fairy lights on the ships' masts.

    Alexander Baxevanis/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: futureshape
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    Elaine Moore/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: 15624270@N03
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    This is Oscar Wilde's tomb, located in Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France. Find London's late literary greats in Highgate Cemetery, resting place of Karl Marx, George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans/Cross), Jeremy Beadle, Douglas Adams and a large portion of Charles Dickens' family, or Bunhill Fields, resting place of Daniel Defoe and William Blake.

    Feeling My Age/ Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: feelingmyage
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    Barbara Müller-Walter/Flickr/(CC BY-ND http://2.0) / Via Flickr: jorbasa
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    London
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    The New German Parliament in Reichstag, Berlin, Germany was designed by British architect Norman Foster who also designed City Hall and part of the British Museum. Our own City Hall, affectionately known as 'the armadillo' is located next to Tower Bridge and Shad Thames: a set of historic riverside streets and side roads. When you're there, take in a free show at The Scoop or visit the Design Museum.

    James Russell/Flickr/(CC BY-SA http://2.0) / Via Flickr: theholyllama
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    Leo Wan/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: hkw92
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    This is London's RAF Museum, built on the former Hendon Aerodrome. Here you can see over 100 aircrafts, listen to Winston Churchill give his 'Battle of Britain' speech to a fearful nation from his 10 Downing Street Office and learn about historic flights.

    Jay/Flickr/(CC BY http://2.0) / Via Flickr: jryde
 
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