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8 Reasons To Contact Your Roommate Before Move-In

You'll be spending the next academic year with this person so it's a good idea to talk to each other before you move into your residence hall this August.

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1. Avoid bringing duplicate shared items.

© Temple University

Make plans with your roommate about how to divide up the shared items. Who will bring what items? You probably don't want 2 TVs, 2 area rugs, 2 vacuums, 2 dustpans, or a bunch of floor lamps. Find out who will bring what and then share those items. This will help you both with cost and space in your new home.

2. Ask your roommate about coordinating the mini-fridge.

© Temple University

Microwaves are not permitted in student rooms, so many rent a MicroFridge. MicroFridges include an attached microwave and are rented or purchased by students. Orders can be placed online at https://www.mymicrofridge.com/. Remember, there can only be one mini-fridge for every two students. Who will bring it? How will you handle the cost of fridge?

3. Discuss living space preferences.

© Temple University

Do air fresheners or certain cleaning products irritate your sinuses or skin? Do you have any allergies? How neat or messy are you? Have you shared a bedroom before? Are you a light or heavy sleeper? Is there anything audible you need to fall asleep (ex. fan, music, TV)? What do you need for your residence hall space to feel like home? It is also important to discuss how often your space will be cleaned and by whom. you better suited with a rotating cleaning schedule or do you require less structure? Will you be sharing cleaning products? Do you have any pet peeves?

4. Talk about guests visiting your space.

© Temple University

This is an important topic because both roommates should agree on who can visit your room. Once on campus, you and your roomate will participate in a Roommate Success Plan to establish mutual expectations. However, it is important to begin establishing mutual respect and boundaries so that you can both feel at home in your new room. Sample talking points include: who you would like to visit you, how often and how long each visit can be, and what times guests are permitted. Also, make sure you both understand the guest policy for the residence hall you live in.

5. Discuss daily habits.

© Temple University

What is your morning routine like? What do you do to get ready for bed? How do you like to study? How often do you watch TV? When do you typically eat meals?

6. Discuss your schedule for the semester.

© Temple University

It's good to know ahead of time if your roommate is a night owl or morning person. Do they have a job, involved with student organizations, or participating in sports, etc? Many roommates like to share their weekly schedule with each other - it's a good way to know when they are coming and going.

7. Find out if your roommate would like to plan the room decor.

© Temple University

Many roommates like to match room decor for a seamless look. Others like the contrast of two different personalities. Talk to your roommate and find out if they have any preference for how the room should be styled.

8. Get to know your roommate.

After you've talked about the logistical aspects of sharing a room, feel free to move onto more personal topics. Many roommates develop close-knit relationships. Are you open to this? At the very least, it is important to establish communication and respect for each other. Feel free to begin having deeper conversations and discover what interests each of you. What are you involved in? What do you care about? How would you describe yourself? How would your friends describe you? What do you love best about yourself? Do you have any hobbies or interests?

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