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This Is How People Around The World Feel About Traveling To The US Now

"I want to visit a country that’s at its peak, to experience the best of the best. Right now, the US isn’t at its peak."

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We heard from close to 2,000 people. While obviously we can't include all the responses, here are some that represent the diverse range of perspectives people shared.

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1. "I cancelled my plans after the election result because being brown I am not sure how safe I will be."

Jason Redmond / AFP / Getty Images

In June 2013, I took a road trip across the USA from Rhode Island to California and back, covering 27 states.

I had plans to travel to the annual Zumba instructors conference in Miami in July this year. But I cancelled my plans after the election result because being brown I am not sure how safe I will be. I am not okay with the immigration officer wanting to check my phone or my social media content. Also I do not want to contribute to the US economy directly. Not with Trump as president. I will probably plan a trip to Mexico to do my part for the resistance movement.

—VJ, India

2. "Now that Trump is president, I still want to go there — but it definitely has changed my perspective."

I always wanted to go to the US because it is a fascinating country to me. The culture there has influenced my daily life so much. I watch American TV shows, movies, I read American books, I eat American food.

Now that Trump is president, I still want to go to there — but it definitely has changed my perspective. I am worried about what is still to come under his presidency, and the recent events (like the Muslim ban) are very alarming. However, I don't think this should discourage people from going and discovering the US, despite President Trump. If his actions get even more discriminatory and non-tolerable in the future, I can imagine not going there in solidarity.

—Laura, 22, Austria

3. "I feel zero difference."

I've been to the US twice: a four-month international exchange program in 2011 (as a student you can go to the US for a summer and work as a waitress, cashier, housekeeper etc.) and then I took a vacation trip in 2014.

I feel zero difference. The election did not affect my take on traveling to the US by any means. As long as I can get a visa and am able to travel overseas financially, I'm OK.

—Yana, 24, Russia

4. "I was considering moving to the US to do a postgraduate degree ... I applied to Canada instead."

Hoang Dinh Nam / AFP / Getty Images

I was considering moving to the US to do a postgraduate degree in peace and conflict studies and had been in the process of applying for scholarships. I always knew I would be sacrificing a fair amount to move to America, especially if I ended up staying long term. In addition to being isolated from my family in Europe, I would be sacrificing healthcare, free/affordable education, labour laws, maternity leave, sane gun laws etc.

I had thought it was worth the risk. With Obama/Clinton/Sanders I thought I saw a movement in the US towards granting basic rights we take for granted in Europe. Trump's election showed me that I was wrong, that my list of cons would probably lengthen, not shorten. So I applied to Canada instead.

For the record, I was also offered a position on a US exchange program two years ago in California. When in the process of researching the colleges, the news about the shootings in UC Santa Barbara broke and I backed out. Reactionary or a sign from the universe I do not know, but I was happier at home where guns are nowhere to be seen and our politics are tediously centrist and boring.

—Ellie, 22, Ireland

5. "I don't know if it's changed since the election... It sort of feels like it's been building up since long before then."

Obviously I'm a bit apprehensive about it. There's generally a bad vibe towards foreigners, it would seem. I mean, I'm from Africa, and even though I'm way down south in Zimbabwe, I could be thought to have some terrorist affiliation with Boko Haram all the way up north or something like that. The ignorance is the problem, and I wonder if it's not better for me to stay here.

But, c'mon, it's America! It's supposed to be the promised land and all that; I want to go to college there, work there, experience the cultures, although that might not really be possible with how things currently are. I don't know if it's changed since the election... It sort of feels like it's been building up since long before then. There's no smoke without fire, and the fire didn't just flare up immediately as the election results came in. Collectively as a nation, there's a deep problem in the US, I feel.

—Rufaro, 18, Zimbabwe

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6. "I'm white and have a clean police record."

I would love to visit America. The country hasn't changed overnight...and besides, I'm white and have a clean police record. I'd be 100% fine. People make such a big deal about it.

—Greg, 17, Australia

7. "I'm not going to put myself or my family at risk ... just because I want to buy a cute top or a guitar that I can buy here in my country."

Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

I used to travel to the US all the time to get clothes, things for school, books, or even musical instruments, but now that Trump's president, I'm starting to look for options here in my city. Plus, the dollar is way too expensive, so it's just cheaper buying stuff here.

I know I can still go ... but I know that Texas is a red state, and honestly I don't really feel comfortable going there anymore. I know that people who live in cities that are right next to the border (ciudades fronterizas) make their living from Mexican people going there to buy, and they are usually very kind. But in general, I just don't feel good traveling there anymore.

The news [like the shooting of two Indian men in Kansas] makes me feel unsafe in the US. What if the next shooting happens somewhere near where I go? I'm not going to put myself or my family at risk of something horrible happening just because I want to buy a cute top or a guitar that I can buy here in my country.

—Anonymous, 20, Mexico

8. "I'm 15 and will be traveling internationally by myself for the first time. I was excited at first, but since Trump's been elected president, I'm worried."

In August I got into a Parsons intensive summer program. I'm 15 and will be traveling internationally by myself for the first time. I was very excited at first, but since Trump's been elected president, I'm worried that I may not be safe or that I may get held up at immigration.

I was nervous to go as it is, but considering the fact that I've never had to go through immigration alone before, this just adds to the pressure. I'm even having to rethink college options for when the time comes.

—Bhavana, 15, India

9. "One man does not represent the whole nation."

One man does not represent the whole nation (especially one who did not win the popular vote)! The people and the country are fundamentally the same. However much I disagree with what Trump is doing, I am still going to be traveling to the US this year.

—Will, 18, UK

10. "I have had poor experiences with TSA already ... and I am confident that this will only get worse."

Scott Olson / Getty Images

Since the election, I have been feeling strange about wanting to return. I have family in New York that I'd like to visit; I'm dying to go back to Disney World; I want to go to Chicago for the first time, but I'm scared they won't let me in the country or they'll make it extremely hard in passport control.

Even though I haven't travelled since Trump became president, I have had poor experiences with TSA already when trying to leave and arrive in the US, and I am confident that this will only get worse. One time I was traveling from Mexico to Argentina, and I had to do a stopover in Houston, Texas. I believe I was asked "What is the purpose of your visit to the US?" 30 times — when I would only be there for 45 minutes to catch my plane back home, and I showed the ticket several times!

I'm seriously afraid I'll buy a ticket, book a hotel, and then not be able to enter the country or would be allowed there for less time than what I booked. My visa expires in 2019. I have had a US visa all my life, and I've never been rejected in the process. What will happen when I go to the US embassy in October 2019? I don't know.

—Valeria, 30, Argentina

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11. "I always feel welcome."

I've come to New York at a tourist very year since 2001. My feelings about coming to the US haven't changed. I'm not impacted by the travel ban. I always feel welcome, even in interaction with the USCIS staff at the border.

—Matt, 25, New Zealand

12. "I just don't feel safe knowing that Trump has such strong opinions about the Chinese, and he's very unpredictable."

I'm more wary of traveling to the US even though I have a US passport (my dad was a US citizen). I just don't feel safe knowing that Trump has such strong opinions about the Chinese and he's very unpredictable — so who knows what can happen. Since Trump is so confident being a racist, racism just becomes a bigger deal. I've come to the US almost every year for summer school, to visit my sister at university in LA (okay, fine, I was there for Disneyland), and to visit my grandma in San Francisco. So thanks to Trump, I'm reconsidering my entire future.

—Gabi, 16, Hong Kong

13. "I feel like I shouldn't speak Hebrew aloud there for my own safety."

Michael Thomas / Getty Images

Two years ago I went to a Jewish camp in Michigan and five years ago to Disney World. I feel more insecure and a bit scared about traveling to the US now because of the anti-Semitic wave that's happening there since the election (I am Jewish). I feel like I shouldn't speak Hebrew aloud there for my own safety.

—Yasmin, 16, Israel

14. "I don't think it's about religion."

I've been to the US before to visit family and friends. I don't feel any different about traveling there now. Lots of other Muslim-majority countries were not on the travel ban list, so I don't think it's about religion. As a person of color and a religious minority (but not Muslim), I still think I would have a similar experience in the US compared to before.

—Sharun, UK

15. "We had [a wall] in Germany if y'all remember — and no one liked it."

I am going to graduate next year and wanted to take a gap year before I start university. A couple of friends and I had plans to do a road trip around America because of its beautiful nature. But we don't feel welcomed anymore.

My friends and I are all immigrants or daughters/sons of immigrants from eastern countries (I am originally from Turkey). Even though I am not affected by the travel ban, I don't want to travel to a country that decides to ban people to enter because of their heritage. America is a country of immigrants and yet it's planning on building walls. (We had one in Germany if y'all remember — and no one liked it.)

I am Muslim and after hearing all the terrible things Trump and his supporters say about us and hearing about the hate crimes against Muslims, I don't feel safe. I don't think I will travel to the US during Trump's presidency.

—Pakize, 18, Germany

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16. "I still think that your country is bigger than him."

Thos Robinson / Getty Images

I know this sounds corny, but when you hear the words "United States of America," especially in our country, I think of freedom, a modern society, an example of progress in all aspects that a developing country like us (the Philippines) can look up to. A utopia especially to those who are disenfranchised and belong to the groups that need protection (LGBTQ, refugees, etc.) But then November 2016 happened.

I still think that your country is bigger than him. The amount of care, compassion, and empathy that I've seen from Americans in protecting those who are in need of protection is nothing short of amazing. Love will always Trump hate.

—Joseph Mendoza, 24, Philippines

17. "There are far too many other wonderful places in the world."

I definitely feel a bit wary of visiting the US now. The rhetoric coming out seems to be quite hostile towards foreigners. I remember thinking the other day that maybe I wouldn't have a bad experience ’cause I don't look Arab/Muslim and then questioning why on earth that should matter. I don't want to spend my money or vacation days in a place that's becoming more and more hostile to people based entirely on race or religion. There are far too many other wonderful places in the world.

—Anonymous, Kenya

18. "A country isn't about one man — it's about its culture, its people, its landscape."

I still dream about traveling to the US, even if I'm not happy with Trump being president. A country isn't about one man — it's about its culture, its people, its landscape, etc. So if I can, I will definitely come to the USA!

—Cindy, 28, France

19. "It makes me feel a lot more at ease seeing all of these positive examples of involvement and knowing that the majority of Americans aren't on board with President Trump's policies."

Joshua Lott / AFP / Getty Images

My husband and I are currently preparing to relocate our family to Boston because of his job. The plans began long before Trump was elected president, and the result of the election did cause us to think things over again. Especially the rise in hate crime during the very first days after the election was troubling.

I feel so bad admitting it, but I couldn't help thinking selfish things like, "At least we are very Scandinavian looking... At least we don't have daughters... At least the boys both have names that will translate easily into English... At least Hillary had a very large majority of the votes in Boston..." It's terrible to admit, but it felt like the safety of my children suddenly became an issue we had to consider.

We have decided to go ahead with the plans greatly due to how our American friends have reacted to the election result. It makes me feel a lot more at ease seeing all of these positive examples of involvement and knowing that the majority of Americans aren't on board with President Trump's policies.

—Anonymous, 38, Denmark

20. "Being foreign and doing geoscience in the USA with this administration seems like a bad idea."

I'm in the US now, finishing my PhD this spring. I have a Russian wife and a daughter born in the US, and I'm looking for a job: my #1 priority is not in Russia, #2 not in the US. Speaking about work — being foreign and doing geoscience in the USA with this administration seems like a bad idea.

For travels I don't think there will appear any problems, but ... without any urgent needs, I would prefer not to travel simply to avoid risks. So no travels here for a year or two, until impeachment.

—Andrey, Russia

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21. "I don't want to support any place that would put this idiot in charge, but would also like to see a bit more of the country before the eventual apocalypse."

My wife and I booked flights to San Francisco a few weeks ago, but I'm still pretty uncomfortable about the whole thing. I don't want to support any place that would put this idiot in charge, but would also like to see a bit more of the country before the eventual apocalypse.

To be perfectly honest, we're both white, so I don't really expect any issues. I feel terrible saying that, but it is what it is.

—Reid, 39, Australia

22. "I'm scared to get refused at the border because of my name, which is Arabic."

Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

I am supposed to go this summer to Nebraska for an engineering competition with my university. I'm scared to get refused at the border because of my name, which is Arabic because my dad is Arabic, although my mother is white and from Canada. I was born in Quebec and I lived in Tunisia until I was 2. I don't have any memories of it, so it feels like I have been living in Canada for my whole life.

Some weeks ago a kid from Quebec with parents from an Arabic country was going to a competition with his school and got refused at the border and was not given any explanation. I am scared that this will happen to me. I am not a Muslim and my father is not even a committed Muslim, which means he does not follow the rules from the Qur'an or go to the mosque. I am scared only because of my name. I can't even imagine how Muslims are feeling, if that's the way I feel.

—Anonymous, 19, Canada

23. "Why should we visit a country where half my family would be discriminated against for the color of their skin or their sexual orientation?"

The main reason I would travel to the USA is for tourism and I refuse to contribute in any way, shape, or form to Trump's economy. Schadenfreude, I suppose — let his boasts of improving the economy crash and burn in a fiery ball of despair and disaster (hopefully without affecting those already under threat during his term).

I have a multicultural, blended family — is their safety and inclusivity assured? My mother is gay — for how long are her civil rights going to remain protected under that utter waste of oxygen? Why should we visit a country where half my family would be discriminated against for the color of their skin or their sexual orientation? Once there is a leader back in office who is somewhat sane, not pathologically self-serving or paranoid and who values the inclusivity of all citizens, I would love to visit — until then, there are several other countries to explore.

—Jessica, 24, South Africa

24. "Trump is targeting all immigrants, not just illegal immigrants."

I've gone to the US every year since I was 10 months old, for vacation and to study. Now I feel anxious about traveling there. Trump is targeting all immigrants, not just illegal immigrants. It doesn't even matter your education level. He may not be targeting my country or region now, but based on his rhetoric it seems inevitable.

—Ann, 28, Bahamas

25. "I've been held in detention centers for hours, subjected to incredibly intrusive and humiliating screening."

Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images

I'm a Pakistan-born Canadian global affairs student, and I've been able to travel to 29 countries for school and work. So I'm way too familiar with the hazards of traveling while Muslim. I've been held in detention centers for hours, subjected to incredibly intrusive and humiliating screening and pulled aside for "random" screening, as is common for many Muslim men my age.

Years ago, I was coming back home to Toronto via either Washington Dulles or the Houston airport, where I was pulled aside for extra screening. After about an hour waiting, they asked about all my travels and in particular, why I had been to 'Somaliland.' Only after my panic subsided was I able to tell the officer that I had never been to Somaliland. It turned out he had seen my passport stamp from Swaziland and gotten suspicious. Even after I explained away the confusion, the officer sent me back to my seat to wait even more. I almost missed my flight that time.

The fear and suspicion through which I'm viewed in the US is nothing new. But Trump's rhetoric is laying all the Islamophobia bare: It is blatant, in-your-face, and in no need for any other justification. I have actually been calling my political representatives here in Canada expressing my concern about a bill currently being considered in our Parliament which could grant American border agents the ability to question, search, and detain Canadians like me on Canadian soil. That absolutely terrifies me.

There's a popular sentiment here in Canada that we Canadians needlessly pay too much attention to American politics even though it doesn't really affect us. One way the Trump presidency is personally affecting me is that me and my family now absolutely refuse to fly through the US. We will now be spending hundreds of dollars more for direct flights or those with transfers in Europe. And of course, there is no question of visiting the US while Trump is in office.

—Hamza Syed, 25, Canada

26. "As a black African Muslim woman, I'm everything Trump seems to find scary."

I've been to the US for conferences, to visit family and work interviews. I also traveled in November to experience the elections.

As a black African Muslim woman, I'm everything Trump seems to find scary. Additionally, another engineer was held up at customs and made to prove himself. I would honestly think thrice about returning to the US anytime soon. I would rather avoid the indignity of being returned at the border and deported.

—Zee, 32, Nigeria

27. "It would be the worst sort of insult to just stop going."

I've been to the US before for work. I'd still travel there and I'll still continue to travel there regardless of who is currently president (even if I really disagree with him). My boyfriend lives there, is willing — and just might — die for the place. It would be the worst sort of insult to just stop going solely due to a president that some people find less than desirable. Heck, I'd live there, even under Trump's dominion.

—Natalia, 21, Belarus

28. "People in Malaysia keep saying that maybe we'll get put on the Muslim ban list."

Rahman Roslan / Getty Images

I've always wanted to visit and take road trips through the country (like in the movies), but now I wonder if I would feel welcome. People in Malaysia keep saying that maybe we'll get put on the Muslim ban list since our country is a Muslim nation. If I did visit, it would be with a friend or family because I don't think I'd want to run the risk of being turned away from the US when I'm by myself. To be treated like a common criminal when you've done nothing wrong... No, just no.

—Regina, 28, Malaysia

29. "I've heard stories about [issues on entry into the US] for the past 10–15 years, and I doubt it's gotten easier."

I'm worried. I am Swedish but of Turkish origin, with a very un-Western name, from a Muslim family. Beyond that, I've studied English for 20 years and while white-ish in skin tone I still do look like I'm from the Middle East/North Africa, which I've heard from several friends who look relatively similar to me causes issues upon entry into the US. I've heard stories about this for the past 10–15 years, and I doubt it's gotten easier or more lenient post-election.

—Özgür, 27, Sweden

30. "I hope our trip will be without any racial discrimination and that we will make more friends than enemies."

Honestly speaking, I'm still excited to visit America. My trip is planned for April, and I will be traveling with my niece and best friend. Although there will be three of us, I am somewhat scared because we are of Indian descent and with the recent shooting and killing of Indians ... it has made things more apprehensive. But all in all, I hope our trip will be without any racial discrimination and that we will make more friends than enemies.

—Nishita, 27, Fiji

31. "I want to visit a country that's at its peak, to experience the best of the best. Right now, the US isn't at its peak."

Scott Barbour / Getty Images

I was born in Pakistan but raised in Saudi Arabia, where I attended an American International school. My classmates and I all had the same perception of America growing up: We would be accepted for who we are, despite our messy backgrounds as Saudi expats. Many if not all of us applied to colleges in America.

I got into UC Irvine and UC Berkeley. Unfortunately as time went on, my dad became more and more scared of the way I would be treated for being a Muslim Pakistani girl raised in Saudi Arabia, afraid of the racism he heard too often on TV against our people. He changed his mind and didn't let me go. I cried for days on end because all I wanted to do was go to America, the land of my dreams.

I currently study in Australia at the University of Sydney. When I first heard that Trump had won, I was scared. Later I heard there were open Trump supporters shouting, "Grab her by the pussy!" and other demeaning phrases less than 500 meters away from where I was sitting, at Manning Bar. The university security was great at ushering them out and issuing an apology for their unacceptable behavior, but it struck a chord of fear within me regardless: there are people who without meeting me will hate me. Just for my religion. I don't even wear the hijab! I can't begin to understand how women and men who openly display Islam must feel in this day and age.

I know Trump isn't representative of the entire American population, but it's making me think about how people might perceive me negatively in America. I've decided not to go until I feel secure enough about being a Muslim in America, a time and age that I hope approaches soon. I want to visit a country that's at its peak, to experience the best of the best. Right now, the US isn't at its peak. If anything, Trump has only brought upon us all an age of racism we should all fear.

—Anonymous, Pakistan

32. "I am petrified."

I am petrified. I am planning to go the States for my undergrad study this August, and this past month I saw a Facebook post where some college students had written "Go back to your country #Trump" outside the door of a Nepalese student's room. The recent ... hate crimes against immigrants in public settings (especially against Latinos — many people thought my family and I were Latinos during our last visit) makes me worry for my family's safety during our next visit.

—Anonymous, Nepal

33. "I think what Trump is doing is what heaps of countries have already been doing for a while."

I live in Australia and nobody can stay illegally here; it's much worse than in the US. I think what Trump is doing is what heaps of countries already have been doing for a while. It didn't change anything for me because I only go for vacation and recreation. But I do love that place — hope he's not as crazy as he sounds sometimes. Anyway, God bless America :)

—Luiz, 26, Brazil

34. "We are protesting with our wallet."

Geoff Robins / AFP / Getty Images

My husband and I live in Toronto and would go across to Buffalo once a season for a shopping weekend, also flying in maybe once a year to some other place (like Phoenix, Chicago, or NYC) to sightsee or watch a pro sports game. We've decided not to venture in the US anymore under the current climate, and that includes not taking international flights with a stop in the US.

We are protesting with our wallet, but we are also worried about getting caught when things will unavoidably turn violent. We also are vocal on social media and have been to protests in Canada, and are not prepared to be interrogated like criminals at the border and risk being denied entry after driving to the border or paying for hotels and flights.

We both are white, English-speaking people — I cannot imagine trying to go across if we were POCs or Muslim. Some of our friends and co-workers have parents who own property in Florida or Arizona. Normally they would go spend a week there every year and are now thinking hard about whether or not they will do it this year. It will be interesting to see how many of the regular snowbirds will make the trek south next winter.

—Yzzie, 45, Canada

35. "Boycotting the US may sound like a good idea, but I can tell from experience that a country really suffers when tourism is low."

I still really want to go to the US, especially New York, and though the idea that Trump is president makes me want to barf and cry at the same time, I have learned, as a Parisian, that the beauty and the interesting parts of a country should not be affected too much by what is actually happening there.

Boycotting the US may sound like a good idea, but I can tell from experience that a country really suffers when tourism is low, and I want to respect the numerous people who voted against the Pumpkin. I send you a lot of love and courage — never let fear take you down!

—Leah, 20, France

36. "I'm more scared of legal weapons."

I feel a bit awkward because I think he's like our Berlusconi, but I think he won't affect tourism, at least not for me or my country. I don't share his racist ideals and I believe it was the worst choice America could have in this election, but I'll surely visit the US someday. I'm more scared of legal weapons.

—Martina, 27, Italy

37. "They fear us for being 'potential terrorists,' but we're the ones being terrorized here."

Stephanie Keith / Reuters

As a high school student slash aspiring musician, naturally I've always had an American dream just like everyone else. But I think I've got to give that up. Given that even before Trump was president it was already tough work for us Indonesians to be granted an American visa, I couldn't do anything but imagine how time-consuming it should be now.

Last month a good friend of mine who wears a hijab had to take it off for her visa and passport just because she didn't wanna get in trouble in the long run. Recently my aunt (also a hijabi) had travelled to the US and got "randomly checked" and was brought to an "interrogation room" for about an hour or two. Yes, my country isn't on the ban list (despite having the largest Muslim population in the world, but just because Mr. Trump's got numerous business partners here... you know). But regardless, my fear of coming out to the world has only gotten worse ever since he got elected president. They fear us for being "potential terrorists," but we're the ones being terrorized here.

—Deandra, 17, Indonesia

38. "I'm putting my American dream on hold indefinitely."

I'd booked my return tickets to NYC for March this year way before the election. Even if I hadn't, I doubt the election results would've changed my mind about traveling to the US. However, the results did change my mind about wanting to work in the US — at least within the next five years.

It has been my lifelong dream to work and live in the US, because I believed the narrative of the American dream, where anyone from anywhere can find a place to call home in the land of the free. So of course this decision breaks my heart.

But recent events following Trump's election made me realize I had been buying into a caricature of the American ideal. There are many parts of American culture I have yet to viscerally understand, including inherent racism which will inevitably affect me since I'm not white, and are far too complex for me to want to spend my energy on at this period in my life. I will be better off putting that energy into furthering my career in another country.

I'm putting my American dream on hold indefinitely, because I don't want to be a second-class citizen and constantly worry about getting deported. Everything is a compromise, and no country is perfect. But it would be hilariously sad and ironic if I were to lose that basic degree of freedom in a country whose very foundation is the value of freedom itself.

—Grace, 26, Singapore

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

Susie Armitage is the Global Managing Editor and is based in New York.

Contact Susie Armitage at susie.armitage@buzzfeed.com.

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