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    People Are Sharing The Signs Of Privilege That Often Go Unnoticed, And A Lot Of Them Might Apply To You

    You might be taking some of these things for granted.

    This week, Reddit user u/Mburns15 posed a question to the internet: "What is something most people don’t realize is a privilege?" It sparked a massively viral conversation about the invisible ways so many of us carry privilege in our daily lives.

    people on a city street
    D3sign / Getty Images

    Here are some of the top-voted responses from users:

    1. "Privacy. I don't mean digital privacy, I mean a room with solid walls and a door that closes. Lots of people don't have that."

    —u/Much-reality3817

    2. "I'm glad therapy is becoming less stigmatized, but the 'everyone should go to therapy' crowd acts like it's free."

    —u/AdamantArmadillo

    3. "Knowing a firetruck is on its way when there is a fire."

    —u/my_cat_sleeps_alone

    a fire truck
    Manuel Sulzer / Getty Images/Cultura RF

    4. "Learning how to swim. Still surprises me that lots of people never learned how to swim, which is a basic skill for many. It may save your life someday."

    —u/capsule69

    5. "Spontaneity in your daily plans. If you’re a wheelchair user, that’s virtually impossible. So few places have accessible restrooms. Some public transport needs contact 24 hours in advance in order to accommodate you. The list goes on. I envy people who can just go with the flow."

    —u/TheIrishNinjas

    6. "Being able to express PDA (public displays of affection) to your significant other without fearing for their safety and your own."

    —u/Usagisan1000

    a couple kissing at a restaurant
    Commercial Eye / Getty Images

    7. "The ability to buy a drink or snack in the spur of the moment, without thinking about how it would impact your ability to pay for utilities/rent/groceries/essentials."

    —u/Superb-personality47

    8. "The ability to just eat whatever you want without having to read the label and make sure it doesn't have something that'll fuck you up."

    —u/Damn_Dog_Inappropes

    9. "Feeling safe in your own home. Not worrying about rats, mice, roaches, bed bugs, bricks being thrown through windows, violence outside, break-ins."

    —u/yesohoygh

    a rat in a kitchen
    Tenra / Getty Images/iStockphoto

    10. "Being neurotypical."

    —u/Annihilate_the_CCP

    11. "Having people assume you are telling the truth."

    —u/Hobbit_Foot

    12. "Libraries! I think a lot of people who have access to a public library don’t appreciate how much of a privilege that is."

    —u/Tommytster

    a woman at a library
    Tom Werner / Getty Images

    13. "To have people around who can and will help."

    —u/InternationalGas2021

    14. "Having two good parents."

    —u/Elliot_Phantomhive5

    15. "Not having chronic pain."

    —u/Aggravating_Okra_00

    medicine bottles
    Shana Novak / Getty Images

    16. "Being mentally healthy."

    —u/throwaway-blurb

    17. "Uninterrupted power supply."

    —u/PrinzeCaesar

    18. "Having a garbage truck that picks up your trash, and being able to flush toilet paper."

    —u/Usagisan1000

    toilet paper
    Roy Morsch / Getty Images

    19. "Having access to water and a sewage system. Also, the abundance of food in western supermarkets is quite frankly insane. Every day, I try to spend a moment to reflect on how lucky I am."

    —u/DrSealMan

    20. "Having a vehicle."

    —u/VerifiedVillain

    21. "Sanitary products for women! It's different in different parts of the world and for different economic backgrounds."

    —jesuschristsleftfoot

    a woman holding a tampon
    Carol Yepes / Getty Images

    22. "Access to birth control."

    —u/surreal_wheel

    23. "Being able to just quit a job you don’t like."

    —u/Beloay

    24. "Going about your daily life without seriously worrying about your physical safety. Sleeping at night without worrying about whether a bomb is going to come through your roof."

    —u/yourlittlebirdie

    Gaza City being bombed
    Anas Baba / AFP via Getty Images

    25. "Having the ability to express an opinion. Free speech is very censored in a lot of the world."

    —u/BananaLCG

    26. "Criticizing your own government."

    —u/ipf000

    And finally...

    27. "The ability to actually be a kid when young. It's heartbreaking how many children have to grow up or are hardened before they even hit puberty."

    —u/joe_kap

    a child crying
    Carol Yepes / Getty Images

    You can read the full thread of responses on Reddit.

    Note: Some responses have been edited for length and/or clarity.