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A Sorority Deleted This Recruitment Video After Getting A Ton Of Online Backlash

The University of Alabama's Alpha Phi chapter has been criticized by an opinion writer as "selling themselves on looks alone."

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Updated on

The Alabama chapter of Alpha Phi put the video on its YouTube account to attract new members to its sorority during recruitment at the start of the fall semester.

View this video on YouTube

The sorority has since taken down the video, but it has been reuploaded by other users.


But Alpha Phi didn't just attract new members with the video. It also attracted the attention of an opinion writer named A.L. Bailey, who wasn't too happy about it.

Bailey wrote a piece for trashing the video as "reductive and objectifying." In the headline, Bailey says the video is "worse for women than Donald Trump."

The website says Bailey is "a writer, magazine copy editor, and online editor who lives in Hoover." However, Bailey apparently has written for the website only once before, in a recent piece about the Confederate flag.

Bailey writes how "unempowering" the video is to women and how homogenous the sorority is shown to be.

"It's a parade of white girls and blonde hair dye, coordinated clothing, bikinis and daisy dukes, glitter and kisses, bouncing bodies, euphoric hand-holding and hugging, gratuitous booty shots, and matching aviator sunglasses.It's all so racially and aesthetically homogeneous and forced, so hyper-feminine, so reductive and objectifying, so Stepford Wives: College Edition. It's all so ... unempowering."

Bailey adds that the video is only going to recruit creepers and horny college guys, not a "diverse and talented group of young women embarking on a college education."

Bailey insists that the video is setting women back at a time when women are still forced to "work diligently to be taken seriously." The writer uses as an example of this the fact that Donald Trump recently used misogynous slurs against Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly when she challenged him in a debate.

"Meanwhile, these young women, with all their flouncing and hair-flipping, are making it so terribly difficult for anyone to take them seriously, now or in the future...It's the kind of thing that subconsciously educates young men on how to perceive, and subsequently treat, women in their lives," Bailey writes.


The article immediately drew a ton of response on social media. Many people defended the sorority members, saying the author was generalizing them.

My support goes out to the ΑΦ chapter at Alabama. Don't let anyone tell you who you are just because others don't understand #AlphaPhi AOE❤️

Young women who claim to be members of the sorority also spoke out in support of their chapter.

I'm a member of Alpha Phi and have been on the presidents or deans list every semester. Alpha Phi encourages me to be the best person I can

They argued that they are college students, and they aren't going to apologize for having fun.

Maybe college is about having fun, football, and education. Not just solely education? It's about growing up and being on your own

But there were also plenty of people who agreed with Bailey. One mom wrote that when she saw the video she was "horrified."

Just watched the ‘Bama Alpha Phi video and now i’d like to bleach my eyeballs with whatever they used for their hair. As a mom I’m horrified


Someone said Alpha Phi's version of diversity is having "one brunette."

Check out how diverse Alabama’s Alpha Phi is. They have everything from blondes to one brunette. #whitegirlsmatter

After the column and video went viral, the sorority effectively scrubbed itself from the web. The members deleted the sorority's Facebook page, its Twitter, and made its Instagram private. They also deleted the video.

In a statement to BuzzFeed News, a spokesperson for the University of Alabama said the video didn't set a good example.

"This video is not reflective of UA's expectations for student organizations to be responsible digital citizens," said Deborah Lane, the school's associate vice president for university relations. "It is important for student organizations to remember what is posted on social media makes a difference, today and tomorrow, on how they are viewed and perceived."

Neither the Alabama chapter of Alpha Phi nor the national organization responded to a request for comment from BuzzFeed News.