back to top
Community

Sedge And Rushes Quiz

Following on from the Gigantic Grass quiz here's your chance to turn your skills to the wonderful world of sedges, rushes and their allies. Even when you know a plant, can you identify it from just one fragment? All information from the newly released Field Guide to Grasses, Sedges and Rushes, available from The Species Recovery Trust with all proceeds to saving rare species.

Posted on
  1. This is a small sedge that lives in acid mires. But what is it called?

    Carex spicata - Spiked Sedge
    Carex demissa - Common Yellow Sedge
    Carex echinata - Star Sedge
    Carex hostiana - Tawny Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex demissa - Common Yellow Sedge

    These have had a bit of a taxonomic ride recently, but seem to have settled down. All of them have inflorescences resembling spikey pineapples. This one is rather smaller and grows in acidic bog flushes.

    Carex demissa - Common Yellow Sedge
  2. A common site on calcareous grassland

    Carex nigra - Common Sedge
    Carex panicea - Carnation Sedge
    Carex flacca - Glaucous Sedge
    Carex elata - Tufted-sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex flacca - Glaucous Sedge

    Has glaucous (grey/blue) underside to leaves. Fruits very black towards end of summer.

    Carex flacca - Glaucous Sedge
  3. A large sedge with a strikingly triangular stem...

    Carex vulpina - True Fox-sedge
    Carex divisa - Divided Sedge
    Carex hirta - Hairy Sedge
    Carex otrubae - False Fox-sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex otrubae - False Fox-sedge

  4. Back to the bog!

    Carex echinata - Star Sedge
    Carex pulicaris - Flea Sedge
    Carex muricata - Prickly Sedge
    Carex extensa - Long-bracted Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex echinata - Star Sedge

    Has a superficial resemblance to the last one, but fruits smaller and definitely a bit star shaped!

    Carex echinata - Star Sedge
  5. Just one more boggy one...

    Carex vaginata - Sheathed Sedge
    Carex punctata - Dotted Sedge
    Carex hostiana - Tawny Sedge
    Carex panicea - Carnation Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex panicea - Carnation Sedge

    Chocolate and lime swollen fruits - yum

    Carex panicea - Carnation Sedge
  6. I lied about they're only being one more which lives in bogs...

    Carex pauciflora - Few-flowered Sedge
    Carex pulicaris - Flea Sedge
    Carex dioica - Dioecious Sedge
    Carex capillaris - Hair Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex pulicaris - Flea Sedge

    They sort of look like fleas hanging on?

  7. A striking site in heathlands in early summer...

    Carex pendula - Pendulous Sedge
    Carex flacca - Glaucous Sedge
    Carex rostrata - Bottle Sedge
    Carex binervis - Green-ribbed Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex binervis - Green-ribbed Sedge

    Probably the commonest Sedge of heathlands, particularly lowland.

    Carex binervis - Green-ribbed Sedge
  8. Many flattened fruits, the colour sort of gives it away...

    Carex pilulifera - Pill Sedge
    Carex limosa - Bog-sedge
    Carex nigra - Common Sedge
    Carex spicata - Spiked Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex nigra - Common Sedge

    You can confirm it by the leaves, which are long and subtly paler on their top surfaces

    Carex nigra - Common Sedge
  9. Now some Sedge allies (loose members of the sedge family)

    Trichophorum cespitosum - Deergrass
    Eriophorum angustifolium - Common Cottongrass
    Eriophorum vaginatum - Hare's-tail Cottongrass
    Rhynchospora alba - White Beak-sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Eriophorum angustifolium - Common Cottongrass

    Several cottony heads, one of which is on a longer stem

  10. A funny little sedge ally

    Isolepis cernua - Slender Club-rush
    Isoetes echinospora - Spring Quillwort
    Isolepis setacea - Bristle Club-rush
    Trichophorum cespitosum - Deergrass
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Isolepis setacea - Bristle Club-rush

    Long bract above inflorescence (short bract would be cernua)

    Isolepis setacea - Bristle Club-rush
  11. The Don King of grasses...

    Eriophorum vaginatum - Hare's-tail Cottongrass
    Eriophorum angustifolium - Common Cottongrass
    Eriophorum gracile - Slender Cottongrass
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Eriophorum vaginatum - Hare's-tail Cottongrass

    Bunny tails!!!

    Eriophorum vaginatum - Hare's-tail Cottongrass
  12. Another spikey bog-dweller...

    Eleocharis - Spike-rush
    Eleogiton - Club-rush
    Trichophorum - Deergrass
    Isolepis - Clubrush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Eleocharis - Spikerush

  13. Fancy taking it to species level?

    Eleocharis acicularis - Needle Spike-rush
    Eleocharis palustris - Common Spike-rush
    Eleocharis uniglumis - Slender Spike-rush
    Eleocharis quinqueflora - Few-flowered Spike-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Eleocharis quinqueflora - Few-flowered Spike-rush

    Not easy! You may have spotted that it was growing in an acidic bog, which helps narrow it down. It also grows in loose tufts, but these can be hard to see when there's lots of plants. Beyond that you have to look at the glumes, which is pretty hard from a photo!

    Eleocharis quinqueflora - Few-flowered Spike-rush
  14. Ok, on to Rushes. Flowers only to start with. This one has a habit of turning viviparous towards the end of the year.

    Juncus biglumis - Two-flowered Rush
    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush
    Juncus bulbosus - Bulbous Rush
    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus bulbosus - Bulbous Rush

  15. Couple of clues here..

    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
    Juncus compressus - Round-fruited Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush

    Lovely compact fruit right through the year, and the stem is ridged, but only below the flower.

    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
  16. Bit of a stunner!

    Juncus compressus - Round-fruited Rush
    Juncus acutus - Sharp Rush
    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush
    Juncus subnodulosus - Blunt-flowered Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush

    The grasses originally evolved from monocot plants similar to Lilies, and flowers like these strikingly show that evolutionary link. Although they are wind-pollinated the flowers are almost showy enough to attract insects.

    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush
  17. Again, a couple of clues here...

    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
    Juncus balticus - Baltic Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush

    Grey ridged thin leaves, and a spray of flowers falling out

  18. And onto the wider members of the Rush family...

    Luzula pilosa - Hairy Wood-rush
    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush
    Luzula forsteri - Southern Wood-rush
    Luzula campestris - Field Wood-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Luzula campestris - Field Wood-rush

    Very hairy, smallish, very common in good quality grassland

    Luzula campestris - Field Wood-rush
  19. In a wood...

    Luzula pilosa - Hairy Wood-rush
    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush
    Luzula forsteri - Southern Wood-rush
    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Luzula pilosa - Hairy Wood-rush

    Southern Wood-rush is similar but the inflorescence typically droops to one side

    Luzula pilosa - Hairy Wood-rush
  20. On a heath....

    Luzula multiflora - Heath Wood-rush
    Luzula campestris - Field Wood-rush
    Luzula multiflora ssp congesta - Dense-headed Heath Wood-rush
    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Luzula multiflora ssp congesta - Dense-headed Heath Wood-rush

    Rolls off the tongue... Here it is next to normal Heath Wood-rush showing ho compact the head is.

    Luzula multiflora ssp congesta - Dense-headed Heath Wood-rush
  21. Ok, now some 'whole plant' shots. Sedges first...

    Carex remota - Remote Sedge
    Carex divisa - Divided Sedge
    Carex divulsa - Grey Sedge
    Carex sylvatica - Wood-sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex remota - Remote Sedge

    Beautifully fine leaves in tussocks, and you can just about see the spaced out flowers

    Carex remota - Remote Sedge
  22. I'm not going to give you the habitat for this one, but there's two very good indicator species in the shot

    Carex lasiocarpa - Slender Sedge
    Carex caryophyllea - Spring-sedge
    Carex pulicaris - Flea Sedge
    Carex pilulifera - Pill Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex caryophyllea - Spring-sedge

    You may have spotted the Salad Burnet, showing it is chalk/calcareous. It is the most commonly found yellow coloured Sedge is this environment, and can be further confirmed by the club-shaped male inflorescence.

    Carex caryophyllea - Spring-sedge
  23. Quite a distinctive colour on this one...

    Carex caryophyllea - Spring-sedge
    Carex flacca - Glaucous Sedge
    Carex panicea - Carnation Sedge
    Carex leporina - Oval Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex panicea - Carnation Sedge

    Wonder how many of you fell for calling in Glaucous Sedge? Carnation is equally glaucous (a blue grey shade of green) on both sides, so appears extremely glaucous from the top. Glaucous Sedge is mainly glaucous on the underleaf.... (still following that?)

  24. No clues here....

    Carex sylvatica - Wood-sedge
    Carex pendula - Pendulous Sedge
    Carex paniculata - Greater Tussock-sedge
    Carex flava - Large Yellow-sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex pendula - Pendulous Sedge

    The largest of the native sedges, and the most annoying if it's in your garden!

  25. Bit harder, try and work out the habitat first

    Carex caryophyllea - Spring-sedge
    Carex echinata - Star Sedge
    Carex humilis - Dwarf Sedge
    Carex pilulifera - Pill Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex pilulifera - Pill Sedge

    The keen eyed among you may have spotted the Tormentil and Matgrass, confirming this as acid grassland. Once you're there, it is really the only commonly found light green coloured sedge, but is further confirmed by the stems lying prostrate, looking like they've rather given up the will to stay upright. If you then rub your fingers up the stem you'll find the top section just below the fruit is rough. And that's magic...

    Carex pilulifera - Pill Sedge
  26. Up on the moors....

    Carex pendula - Pendulous Sedge
    Carex pilulifera - Pill Sedge
    Carex leporina - Oval Sedge
    Carex binervis - Green-ribbed Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex binervis - Green-ribbed Sedge

    Lovely rich dark green colour, w-shaped cross section to leaves

    Carex binervis - Green-ribbed Sedge
  27. Ok, some sedge allies now....

    Eriophorum vaginatum - Hare's-tail Cottongrass
    Eriophorum angustifolium -Common Cottongrass
    Schoenus nigricans - Black Bog-rush
    Rhynchospora alba- White Beak-sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Eriophorum vaginatum- Hare's-tail Cottongrass

    Ain't she pretty!

    Eriophorum vaginatum- Hare's-tail Cottongrass
  28. In a bog, near a log...

    Isoetes lacustris - Quillwort
    Isolepis cernua - Slender Club-rush
    Isolepis setacea - Bristle Club-rush
    Eleocharis uniglumis - Slender Spike-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Isolepis setacea - Bristle Club-rush

    Needly leaves with a long terminal bract (cernua would be much shorter)

    Isolepis setacea - Bristle Club-rush
  29. Back into the dry (-er) for this nice clumpy one

    Schoenus nigricans - Black Bog-rush
    Rhynchospora alba- White Beak-sedge
    Trichophorum germanicum - Deergrass
    Carex lachenalii - Hare's-foot Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Trichophorum cespitosum - Deergrass

    Clumps go very yellow towards end of summer, stems are ridged with white grooves.

    Trichophorum cespitosum - Deergrass
  30. Some Rushes..... This one does a very good impression of a grass though.

    Juncus capitatus - Dwarf Rush
    Juncus bufonius - Toad Rush
    Juncus bulbosus - Bulbous Rush
    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus bulbosus - Bulbous Rush

    Red tinged swollen stem bases

    Juncus bulbosus - Bulbous Rush
  31. A bit harder - the habitat might help?

    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
    Juncus compressus - Round-fruited Rush
    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush

    Quite easy to muddle up with Soft Rush. The heads are more compact, and is the top photo is seen growing in damp heath, where you'd be unlikely to find Soft Rush, unless the landowner had been up to something naughty...

    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
  32. Juncus acutiflorus - Sharp-flowered Rush
    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush
    Juncus capitatus - Dwarf Rush
    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus squarrosus - Heath Rush

    An incredibly highly evolved Rush. You can see in this pic how some of the upright leaves have been grazed off, but the prostrate ones are unaffected, allowing it to thrive in grazed environments. It also has specialised grooved leaves, allowing it to survive in much dryer soils than many other rushes.

  33. Easy-peasy (well, hopefully)

    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
    Juncus acutiflorus - Sharp-flowered Rush
    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
    Juncus conglomeratus - Compact Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush

    Greyish, thin stems

  34. And some Luzulas (Luzulae?) to round off the whole plants section

    Luzula forsteri - Southern Wood-rush
    Luzula pilosa - Hairy Wood-rush
    Luzula multiflora - Heath Wood-rush
    Luzula campestris - Field Wood-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Luzula campestris - Field Wood-rush

    Bit hard from a photo, but the smallish size and big red knobs on the end of the leaves point to campestris (tee-hee)

  35. In a damp Dartmoor wood...

    Luzula pilosa - Hairy Wood-rush
    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush
    Luzula forsteri - Southern Wood-rush
    Luzula multiflora - Heath Wood-rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush

    Luzula sylvatica - Great Wood-rush
  36. Ok, now you're warmed up it's time to do it off just a bit of a plant. And they're all muddled up from here on...

    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
    Juncus articulatus - Jointed Rush
    Juncus acutus - Sharp Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush

    Interrupted pith - textbook Hard rush

    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
  37. The definitive trigonous tip. Found in bogs.

    Carex rariflora - Mountain Bog-sedge
    Eriophorum vaginatum - Hare's-tail Cottongrass
    Carex lasiocarpa - Slender Sedge
    Eriophorum angustifolium - Common Cottongrass
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Eriophorum angustifolium - Common Cottongrass

    The top third of the leaf has this unusual structure called a trigonous tip, where it forms a solid triangular cross-section

  38. A sedge. But which one?

    Carex dioica - Dioecious Sedge
    Carex filiformis - Downy-fruited Sedge
    Carex paniculata - Greater Tussock-sedge
    Carex hirta - Hairy Sedge
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Carex hirta - Hairy Sedge

    This in theory is one of the easiest sedges to identify - it has hairy leaves, stems and fruits, and is called Hairy. Except sometimes it doesn't have any hairs. How helpful is that? This version tends to pop up in very wet meadows. Maybe one day it will be declared a sub-species; Carex hirta ssp. baldense

  39. A pillar of pith (sounds like an early Genesis album)

    Juncus articulatus - Jointed Rush
    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
    Juncus inflexus - Hard Rush
    Juncus bufonius - Toad Rush
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush

    Continuous pith. You can actually run your thumb up and remove it all, but that's actually taking the pith...I'm here all week

    Juncus effusus - Soft-rush
  40. Ooo, tough one...

    Eleocharis uniglumis - Slender Spike-rush
    Carex spicata - Spiked Sedge
    Eleocharis multicaulis - Many-stalked Spike-rush
    Trichophorum germanicum - Deergrass
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Trichophorum cespitosum - Deergrass

    Yes indeedy. Deergrass stems are not only ridged but the grooves of the ridges are white, giving it a slightly stripy look. (Not that you can particularly see that from this photo). The inflorescence is rather more enclosed by its glumes than the Eleocharis's are.

    Trichophorum cespitosum - Deergrass

Sedge And Rushes Quiz

Nit-grass

Well, you have to start somewhere...

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
Bog-sedge

Not bad!!

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
Rock-sedge

You rock! (sedges)

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
Rare Spring-sedge

You have an unusual set of skills...

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
Greater Tussock-sedge

You are the ruler of all the rushes. A sultan of sedges. A leader of Luzula. An emperor of Eleogiton. Etc....

Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
This post was created by a member of BuzzFeed Community, where anyone can post awesome lists and creations. Learn more or post your buzz!

Every. Tasty. Video. EVER. The new Tasty app is here!

Dismiss