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8 English Words You Should Never Use Overseas

You may think it's easy to communicate when you're visiting another English-speaking country, but think again! Certain words mean something entirely different on the other side of the world. By Caroline Morse, SmarterTravel.com

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Pants

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Be careful who you tell in the U.K. that you have to go pants shopping—across the pond, "pants" means "underwear." When you're talking about jeans and khakis, you should call them "trousers."

Avoid Using In: The U.K., Ireland

Fanny

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Own a fanny pack? In most other English-speaking countries, they're called "bum bags" because "fanny" is slang for a part of the female anatomy (and no, we're not talking about the rear end). So don't tell someone to stop being lazy and get off their fanny, either!

Avoid Using In: The U.K., Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa

Pissed

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In America, we may get "pissed off" when we're angry, but the Brits and Irish who are "pissed" are extremely intoxicated. "Taking the piss," however, means "to make fun of," not "to get drunk."

Avoid Using In: The U.K., Ireland, Australia, New Zealand

Bangs

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Prepare for weird looks if you're bragging about your new "bangs" in England. A forehead-covering haircut over there is referred to as a "fringe" instead. Overseas, "bangs" is more commonly used as the somewhat vulgar slang that it is interchangeable with in America.

Avoid Using In: Anywhere outside of North America

Knob

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Americans hear the word "knob" and think "doorknob" or "lever." It has a much dirtier meaning in other countries, like Australia and the U.K., where it's an insult or slang for a part of the male anatomy. Now you'll know to be offended if someone calls you a "knob head."

Avoid Using In: The U.K., Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa

Pull

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If someone "pulled" last night in the U.K., they're probably not talking about pulling a muscle or drawing something apart. It's commonly used as slang for successfully picking up someone while out on the town. Likewise, "going on the pull" means that someone is going out with the express goal of getting some action.

Avoid Using In: The U.K., Ireland

Bugger

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If you affectionately call your child or pet "little bugger," you might want to reconsider doing so in pretty much any other English-speaking country. In most other places, from Canada to Australia, it is commonly used as an expletive similar to the f-word.

Avoid Using In: Most places outside of America

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