8 Ways To Get Rid Of The Button-Down Boob Gap

The nightmare ends today.

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First, a moment of silence for all the button-down shirts that left this world too soon.

Now, let's start the revolution of button-downs and busty chests.

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We reached out to several fashion bloggers to get their personal tips on how well endowed women can rock a button-down because, yes — it's possible.

1. Don't give up hope.

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"Before I realized that it was OK not to wear a push-up bra as a woman, I would buy these gravity-defying works of art from Victoria Secret," says Ashleigh "Bing" Bingham, founder of the I Dream of Dapper fashion blog. "Wearing button-up shirts with those guys on was like trying to stretch a single piece of fabric over the Egyptian pyramids and fastening it there with bubble gum."

2. Do some prep and reduce size with undergarments.

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"When I first starting wearing button-downs, I found ways to reduce my chest enough to avoid the dreaded 'peek-a-boob' gap that happens when boobs meet buttons. Spandex tank tops and sports bras can be your best friends, but sometimes you need to pull out the big guns and go for a chest binder (if you are so determined). I bind in order to avoid hulking out at any minute and enjoy the way it makes my body look in my shirts," says Bing.

Below: Wearing an everyday bra (left) and a binder (right).

3. Think outside the box...and the women's section of the store:

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"I wear men's dress shirts from Express and Ralph Lauren and I find that they suit the feminine body rather well. Of course, there are still some issues depending on your body shape, but the quality is great and the design is reliable," says Bing.

4. Upgrade the shirts you already own.

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"If reduce is not your style, it's time to get McGyver-y. The part of the shirt that the buttons are sewn on to are usually double panels (which means there are two layers of fabric). If you're good with a needle and thread, you can sew a smaller button on the inside of the your button panel and make a hole for it on the other. This hides the button while giving extra support to those around it. A snap can also be used if you aren't so sure about cutting into a new shirt," says Bing.

If you're truly brave you can try performing your own "Gapectomy" (shown below) like fashion blogger Lilli Pascuzzi.

Not savvy with a needle and thread? Get some double-stick tape into your life.

Creative suggestion: Never underestimate a well-placed pin.

5. Two words: concealed zipper.

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"Ever since we started developing the shirt my female friends have been asking me to do a woman's version," Bryan Davis, founder of Teddy Stratford shirt company, says of his brand's one-of-a-kind concealed zipper design. "And when we launched our Kickstarter, we got a ton of requests from women all over the world," says Davis. "I know that the 'gapping' between buttons is a bigger/more painful issue for women than men. The good news is that the shirt is super fitted and is made for guys who have broad chests and slimmer waists, so, while it is not technically a woman's shirt, it would tend to fit the female form better than a regular men's shirt."

6. Shop at clothing lines that create for curvy figures and androgynous style.

Yes, some brands are actually aware of the problems that arise with larger busts and button-downs. "Ready-to-wear brands such as Androgyny, The Shirt by Rochelle Behrens, and Saint Harridan are designing shirts that specifically address fit issues, such as gaping, in the chest area," Anita Dolce Vita, editor-in-chief of DapperQ told BuzzFeed.

If you get a top from The Shirt, your button-down will come with their patented "No Gape Button Technology," which sounds super fancy and high-tech. "We know from our own experience it's empowering women to perform better because they're not worrying about whether they're flashing their chest to their colleagues or anyone else," says Rochelle Behrens, creator of The Shirt.

7. Become besties with your tailor.

Even if you end up shelling out a few more dollars than you'd like, the payoff will be a shirt that actually fits and (gasp) that you actually wear!

Feeling like a big spender? Go totally custom. "For the absolute best fit, we recommend getting your button-downs custom made. Ratio Clothing, Indochino, Sharpe Suiting, and Bindle & Keep are reader favorites for bespoke button-downs," Vita says.