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This Quiz Shows What It's Like To Have A Color Deficiency

The world looks different for people with color deficiencies. Can you spot the differences in each photo? With Samsung's new QLED TV, people with color deficiencies can see colors vividly.

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The world has a different kind of beauty for people with color deficiencies.

Prasit Rodphan / Via gettyimages.com

The left side of the image hasn't been altered, but the right side shows what the world might look like for someone with a red-weak color deficiency.

Prasit Rodphan / Via gettyimages.com

The left side of the image hasn't been altered, but the right side shows what the world might look like for someone with a red-weak color deficiency.

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Prasit Rodphan / Via gettyimages.com

The left side of the image hasn't been altered, but the right side shows what the world might look like for someone with a red-weak color deficiency.

We've altered one object in each image to simulate the eight different forms of color deficiencies. Can you spot them all?

  1. 1. Which berry in this image has been altered?

    Magone / Getty Images
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    This is how a red berry might look to someone with deuteranopia.

    With deuteranopia, there are no functioning green cones. This causes reds to look brown or yellow and green to appear as beige.

    This is how a red berry might look to someone with deuteranopia. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  2. 2. Which balloon has been altered?

    Hajakely / Getty Images
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    The altered image shows what these balloons might look like to someone with a protanomaly.

    With protanomaly, photopigments in red cones are abnormal. The colors red, orange, and yellow appear greener, with colors appearing more subdued.

    The altered image shows what these balloons might look like to someone with a protanomaly. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  3. 3. Which piece of cotton candy has been altered?

    peterkai / Getty Images
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    This is what the whole image of cotton candy might look like for someone with protanopia.

    People with protanopia have no working red cone cells. The color red appears black, and certain shades of orange, yellow, and green appear yellowish.

    This is what the whole image of cotton candy might look like for someone with protanopia. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  4. 4. Which object in this image has been altered?

    ChristopherBernard / Getty Images
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    This is how the yellow flowers might look to someone with deuteranomaly.

    Green cones are abnormal for people with deuteranomaly, causing yellows and greens to appear redder. Deuteranomaly can also make it difficult to distinguish violet from blue.

    This is how the yellow flowers might look to someone with deuteranomaly. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  5. 5. Which piece of candy has been altered?

    LauriPatterson / Getty Images
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    This is how a yellow piece of candy might look to someone with tritanopia.

    Tritanopia is the lack of blue cone cells. This causes blue to appear green and yellow to appear violet or light gray.

    This is how a yellow piece of candy might look to someone with tritanopia. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  6. 6. Which macaron has been altered?

    karandaev / Getty Images
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    This is how a yellow macaron might look to someone with tritanomaly.

    With tritanomaly, blue cone cells have limited functionality. This causes blues to appear greener and makes it difficult to distinguish yellow and red from pink.

    This is how a yellow macaron might look to someone with tritanomaly. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  7. 7. Which pepper has been altered?

    CampPhoto / Getty Images
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    The dark pepper would appear colorless to someone with rod monochromacy.

    With rod monochromacy, all cone cells lack functional photopigments. This means that people with rod monochromacy essentially see the world in black and white.

    The dark pepper would appear colorless to someone with rod monochromacy. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
  8. 8. Which doughnut has been altered?

    Nataliia Pyzhova / Getty Images
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    This is how the white-and-blue doughnut might look to someone with a blue cone monochromacy.

    A green, red, or blue cone monochromacy is the result of two or three cone cell photopigments failing to work. People with cone monochromacy have difficulty distinguishing between different colors.

    This is how the white-and-blue doughnut might look to someone with a blue cone monochromacy. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF

Facts from The National Eye Institute.

If you or someone you know has a color deficiency, Samsung has a TV made especially for them: the Samsung 4K QLED. Download the SeeColors app today and experience the vivid colors for yourself.

View this video on YouTube

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Courtesy of Samsung
 
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