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This Woman Recreated An Iconic World War II Photo In The Dug Up Roads Outside Her Home In Mumbai

"Roadworks begin here after Diwali and end, desperately and haphazardly finished, around the onset of the monsoon. EVERY. FUCKING. YEAR."

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As fast as India is developing, even those living in its most urban metros have come to accept year-round public construction as a daily inconvenience.

Indranil Mukherjee / AFP / Getty Images

The situation is especially grim in Mumbai, where dug-up roads can be found delaying traffic in every corner of the city.

One of these corners just happens to be St. Paul's Road in Bandra, which has remained in a shambles for the past few months.

Twitter: @genesiaalves

The local municipal corporation (BMC) has failed to inform residents about what they're constructing, or how long they'll take to complete it.

Writer and journalist Genesia Alves – who's lived in the area for the past five years – decided that she'd had enough earlier this week, and tweeted that she wanted to do a "post-apocalyptic shoot" in the rubble.

Fashion mags. Want a post apocalyptic shoot with undead refs? Recce St Paul's Rd. (Screaming banshee also available… https://t.co/cJZ9y6f0PK

"I'm constantly threatening to do things – take weird pictures, organise funerals for every tree the BMC cuts. Usually because of time constraints and personal logistics I make do with just shouting at errant motorists. (My children now beg me to STFU)," Alves told BuzzFeed.

And true to her word, Alves followed through on her tweet and roped in her 16-year-old daughter to recreate it right outside her home.

Hey #Bandra I made a tribute to the BMC digging. #TeaDuringTheBlitz

"I gave her the original photo as reference and she directed my body language, took two photos, and WE RAN AWAY," Alves said about their stunt.

"It's endemic. Mumbai residents know that roadworks begin after Diwali and end, desperately and haphazardly finished, around the onset of the monsoon. EVERY. FUCKING. YEAR."

Twitter: @genesiaalves

"The amount of time and energy just wasted in navigating the chaos is unproductive and I'll be honest, really heartbreaking. Especially for children and the elderly," Alves added.

Twitter: @genesiaalves

"The amount of time and energy just wasted in navigating the chaos is unproductive and I'll be honest, really heartbreaking. Especially for children and the elderly," Alves added.

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Twitter: @genesiaalves

"The amount of time and energy just wasted in navigating the chaos is unproductive and I'll be honest, really heartbreaking. Especially for children and the elderly," Alves added.

And when asked if she would recreate more such photos, Alves said that she hoped there would be less opportunity to pose against what looks like an apocalypse.

Indranil Mukherjee / AFP / Getty Images

"Why is it so hard to have a plan that upgrades the city without causing so much hardship to the people who live here? And that's what drinking tea on the rubble is, isn't it? We just get on with it. It shouldn't have to be this way," Alves told BuzzFeed.

Sahil Rizwan is a social news reporter for BuzzFeed and is based in Mumbai.

Contact Sahil Rizwan at sahil.rizwan@buzzfeed.com.

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