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5 Things You Didn't Know About The History Of Corn In North America

CORN!!

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1. Corn derived from southern Mexico.

Maize was developed from a wild grass (Teosinte) originally growing in Central America (southern Mexico) 7,000 years ago.
Via nativetech.org

Maize was developed from a wild grass (Teosinte) originally growing in Central America (southern Mexico) 7,000 years ago.

2. The first ears of maize were only a few inches long and had only eight rows of kernels.

By systematically collecting and cultivating those plants best suited for human consumption, Native Americans encouraged the formation of ears or cobs on early maize.Cob length and size of early maize grew over the next several thousand years which gradually increased the yields of each crop.
Via nativetech.org

By systematically collecting and cultivating those plants best suited for human consumption, Native Americans encouraged the formation of ears or cobs on early maize.Cob length and size of early maize grew over the next several thousand years which gradually increased the yields of each crop.

3. The introduction of agriculture changed lifestyles.

Eventually the productivity of maize cultivation was great enough to make it possible and worthwhile for a family to produce food for the bulk of their diet for an entire year from a small area.
Via nativetech.org

Eventually the productivity of maize cultivation was great enough to make it possible and worthwhile for a family to produce food for the bulk of their diet for an entire year from a small area.

4. The practice of maize agriculture did not reach southern New England until about a thousand years ago.

As the lifeways of mobile hunting and gathering were often transformed into sedentary agricultural customs, very slowly the cultivation of maize, along with beans and squash, was introduced into the southwestern and southeastern parts of North America. The practice of maize agriculture did not reach southern New England until about a thousand years ago.
Via engaginglandowners.org

As the lifeways of mobile hunting and gathering were often transformed into sedentary agricultural customs, very slowly the cultivation of maize, along with beans and squash, was introduced into the southwestern and southeastern parts of North America. The practice of maize agriculture did not reach southern New England until about a thousand years ago.

5. Native Americans discovered that, unlike wild plants and animals, a surplus of maize could be grown and harvested without harming their environment.

Tribes in southern New England harvested great amounts of maize and dried them in heaps upon mats. The drying piles of maize, usually two or three for each Narragansett family, often contained from 12 to 20 bushels of the grain. Surplus maize would be stored in underground storage pits, ingeniously constructed and lined with grasses to prevent mildew or spoiling, for winter consumption of the grain.
Via en.wikipedia.org

Tribes in southern New England harvested great amounts of maize and dried them in heaps upon mats. The drying piles of maize, usually two or three for each Narragansett family, often contained from 12 to 20 bushels of the grain. Surplus maize would be stored in underground storage pits, ingeniously constructed and lined with grasses to prevent mildew or spoiling, for winter consumption of the grain.

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