go to content

Here's What Your Favourite '90s Footballers Are Doing Now

What became of the likes of Stig Inge Bjornebye, Andre Kanchelskis and Jason Lee?

Posted on

1. Stig Inge Bjornebye – Liverpool, Norway.

Then: Liverpool cult hero, who had his own chant based on a Gary Glitter song...

Now: Bjornebye, now 46, had a brief managerial career after retiring from the game.

2. Patrik Berger – Liverpool, Czech Republic.

Getty Images

Then: Good ball player, much-loved at Anfield.

Now: Loves football so much, he started playing for his local amateur team and was still playing at the age of 40, he's now 42. He somehow looks younger now.

Getty Images

Then: Good ball player, much-loved at Anfield.

Now: Loves football so much, he started playing for his local amateur team and was still playing at the age of 40, he's now 42. He somehow looks younger now.

← Slide →
Getty Images

Then: Good ball player, much-loved at Anfield.

Now: Loves football so much, he started playing for his local amateur team and was still playing at the age of 40, he's now 42. He somehow looks younger now.

3. Andrei Kanchelskis – Man United, Everton, Russia.

Then: One of the first big foreign stars of the '90s at United, kids in the '90s idolised him, even if they couldn't pronounce his name.

Now: Plying his trade in the world of management, Kanchelskis last managed in the Latvian leagues. He still has the same haircut.

4. Ugo Ehiogu – England, Aston Villa, Rangers.

Shaun Botterill/Allsport / Alex Livesey / Getty Images

Then: Reliable centre-back whose name we're still not entirely sure how to pronounce, but on FIFA '97 they pronounced it "eck-ee-ogg".

Now: Ehiogu, now 43, is the coach for the Tottenham Hotspur under-21 team. And we all know how well Tottenham's academy players are doing these days.

Shaun Botterill/Allsport / Alex Livesey / Getty Images

Then: Reliable centre-back whose name we're still not entirely sure how to pronounce, but on FIFA '97 they pronounced it "eck-ee-ogg".

Now: Ehiogu, now 43, is the coach for the Tottenham Hotspur under-21 team. And we all know how well Tottenham's academy players are doing these days.

← Slide →
Shaun Botterill/Allsport / Alex Livesey / Getty Images

Then: Reliable centre-back whose name we're still not entirely sure how to pronounce, but on FIFA '97 they pronounced it "eck-ee-ogg".

Now: Ehiogu, now 43, is the coach for the Tottenham Hotspur under-21 team. And we all know how well Tottenham's academy players are doing these days.

5. Faustino Asprilla – Colombia, Newcastle United.

Gary M Prior /Allsport / Getty Images

Then: Tino, an acrobatic fan-favourite, was unduly blamed for being a key reason Newcastle didn't win a Premier League title in the mid-90s. It was probably more down to Kevin Keegan's gung ho tactics.

Now: Apsrilla does punditry in his home country of Colombia.

It was reported in September 2014 that he was planning to launch a range of flavoured condoms in the South American country.

Gary M Prior /Allsport / Getty Images

Then: Tino, an acrobatic fan-favourite, was unduly blamed for being a key reason Newcastle didn't win a Premier League title in the mid-90s. It was probably more down to Kevin Keegan's gung ho tactics.

Now: Apsrilla does punditry in his home country of Colombia.

It was reported in September 2014 that he was planning to launch a range of flavoured condoms in the South American country.

← Slide →
Gary M Prior /Allsport / Getty Images

Then: Tino, an acrobatic fan-favourite, was unduly blamed for being a key reason Newcastle didn't win a Premier League title in the mid-90s. It was probably more down to Kevin Keegan's gung ho tactics.

Now: Apsrilla does punditry in his home country of Colombia.

It was reported in September 2014 that he was planning to launch a range of flavoured condoms in the South American country.

6. Karel Poborsky – Man United, Czech Republic.

Then: Came to the Premier League with great promise, but didn't *quite* fulfil that promise at Manchester United.

Now: Poborsky, now 43, retired from football in 2007 and became a full-time hipster.

7. Paulo Wanchope – Derby, West Ham, Man City, Costa Rica.

Gary M Prior/Allsport /MARK RALSTON/AFP / Getty Images

Then: First came to the Premier League when he moved to Derby for £600k in 1997, and subsequently moved on to West Ham and then Man City.

Now: Paulo Wanchope went into management, taking charge of Costa Rica. In August 2015 he was filmed fighting a security guard at a Costa Rica under-23 match.

He is no longer manager of Costa Rica.

Gary M Prior/Allsport /MARK RALSTON/AFP / Getty Images

Then: First came to the Premier League when he moved to Derby for £600k in 1997, and subsequently moved on to West Ham and then Man City.

Now: Paulo Wanchope went into management, taking charge of Costa Rica. In August 2015 he was filmed fighting a security guard at a Costa Rica under-23 match.

He is no longer manager of Costa Rica.

← Slide →
Gary M Prior/Allsport /MARK RALSTON/AFP / Getty Images

Then: First came to the Premier League when he moved to Derby for £600k in 1997, and subsequently moved on to West Ham and then Man City.

Now: Paulo Wanchope went into management, taking charge of Costa Rica. In August 2015 he was filmed fighting a security guard at a Costa Rica under-23 match.

He is no longer manager of Costa Rica.

8. Jason Lee: Nottingham Forest (and many, many other clubs).

Then: Football journeyman who on average changed clubs once per year. Known for his rather resplendent hair, he had his own chant: "He's got a pineapple, on his head, he's got a pineapple, on his head!"

Now: Sans hair, and sans facial hair, Jason Lee has most recently been working for the PFA as Equalities Education Executive.

9. Vinnie Jones – Wimbledon, Wales (never forget), Guy Ritchie films.

Then: Bloke who duffed up other blokes on a football pitch.

Now: Bloke who duffs up other blokes in films.

10. Luke Chadwick – Man United... England U-21.

Then: Chadders never really made it at Man United, though he was a cult hero among football fans for being like a budget version of David Beckham in every singe way possible.

Now: He's carved out a good career in the lower leagues, and played against Man United in 2015 for Cambridge United.

Then: Chadders never really made it at Man United, though he was a cult hero among football fans for being like a budget version of David Beckham in every singe way possible.

Now: He's carved out a good career in the lower leagues, and played against Man United in 2015 for Cambridge United.

← Slide →

Then: Chadders never really made it at Man United, though he was a cult hero among football fans for being like a budget version of David Beckham in every singe way possible.

Now: He's carved out a good career in the lower leagues, and played against Man United in 2015 for Cambridge United.

11. Des Walker: Nottingham Forest, Sampdoria, England.

Then: Incredibly agile defender, with a fairly clean disciplinary record for somebody who was renowned for slide tackling. He was a defensive fortress for the first part of his career, but was quite reliant on his pace. He lost a yard or two later in his career and the chant "You'll never beat Des Walker" became less and less accurate.

Now: Walker is pictured above taking part in a charity match in 2012. Premier League Heroes reports that In 2013 Walker appeared in a music video along with Stuart Pearce, Teddy Sheringham and Les Ferdinand for Nottingham based band “The Establishment” – (who were apparently managed by Dion Dublin).

12. Kevin Pressman – Sheffield Wednesday.

Then: Played at Sheffield Wednesday for a whopping 17 years

Now: Pressman, now 48, has had a successful career as a goalkeeping coach, he is currently goalkeeping coach at Millwall.

Then: Played at Sheffield Wednesday for a whopping 17 years

Now: Pressman, now 48, has had a successful career as a goalkeeping coach, he is currently goalkeeping coach at Millwall.

← Slide →

Then: Played at Sheffield Wednesday for a whopping 17 years

Now: Pressman, now 48, has had a successful career as a goalkeeping coach, he is currently goalkeeping coach at Millwall.

13. Jamie Pollock – Middlesbrough, Man City.

Then: Scorer of literally the greatest own goal of all time, he was a terrace hero despite not being the best player in the world.

Now: Pollock launched a personal training company after a brief spell in management, and also owns a glazing company in Middlesbrough.

14. Ronaldo – PSV, Barca, Inter, Brazil.

Then: No explanation needed.

Now: Arguably the most talented footballer of all time, Ronaldo plays poker, owns various businesses, and pulls names out of hats for FIFA.

15. David Ginola – PSV, Newcastle, Spurs, France. Part-time model, actor.

Then: A footballer, not a movie star.

Now: After retiring from football, Ginola pursued his dream of making wine, obviously. He won an award for his wine in 2008. He also does bits and bobs on TV and is generally loved throughout the world for being David Ginola.

Then: A footballer, not a movie star.

Now: After retiring from football, Ginola pursued his dream of making wine, obviously. He won an award for his wine in 2008. He also does bits and bobs on TV and is generally loved throughout the world for being David Ginola.

← Slide →

Then: A footballer, not a movie star.

Now: After retiring from football, Ginola pursued his dream of making wine, obviously. He won an award for his wine in 2008. He also does bits and bobs on TV and is generally loved throughout the world for being David Ginola.

16. Ed De Goey – Chelsea, Netherlands.

Then: Played in the Premier League for Chelsea and Stoke, he didn't cut the most imposing figure between the sticks, but he was a decent keeper.

Now: EDJ, now 49, became goalkeeper coach for RKC Waalwijk after retiring from the game. He ended his playing career at Stoke City in 2006.

17. David Beckham – Manchester United, England.

Then: One of the best right pegs in the world, a demon in '98, a hero in '99.

Now: Probably one of *the* most photographed people in the world, Beckham does charity work, modelling, and rides a motorcycle around Los Angeles, because... why not?

18. Tore Andre Flo – Chelsea, Norway.

Then: In the '90s the Norwegians had a term called "Flo-pasning", which means "Flo pass". It became shorthand for what, in the UK, we'd describe as "lumping it up top". At 6ft 4in tall, you can see why they opted to play this way with Tore Andre Flo up front.

Now: Flo, now 42, runs a football academy in the UK, taking many of the coaching sessions himself.

Then: In the '90s the Norwegians had a term called "Flo-pasning", which means "Flo pass". It became shorthand for what, in the UK, we'd describe as "lumping it up top". At 6ft 4in tall, you can see why they opted to play this way with Tore Andre Flo up front.

Now: Flo, now 42, runs a football academy in the UK, taking many of the coaching sessions himself.

← Slide →

Then: In the '90s the Norwegians had a term called "Flo-pasning", which means "Flo pass". It became shorthand for what, in the UK, we'd describe as "lumping it up top". At 6ft 4in tall, you can see why they opted to play this way with Tore Andre Flo up front.

Now: Flo, now 42, runs a football academy in the UK, taking many of the coaching sessions himself.

19. Neville Southall – Everton, Wales.

Then: A goalkeeping legend, he was hero for Wales and Everton, known as one of the great keepers of his generation.

Now: Neville Southall, has done almost everything since retiring as a player. He has coached, he's managed clubs, and he even started a phone hotline and website where you could give him a buzz and get advice on how to be a goalkeeper.

The website is now offline.

Then: A goalkeeping legend, he was hero for Wales and Everton, known as one of the great keepers of his generation.

Now: Neville Southall, has done almost everything since retiring as a player. He has coached, he's managed clubs, and he even started a phone hotline and website where you could give him a buzz and get advice on how to be a goalkeeper.

The website is now offline.

← Slide →

Then: A goalkeeping legend, he was hero for Wales and Everton, known as one of the great keepers of his generation.

Now: Neville Southall, has done almost everything since retiring as a player. He has coached, he's managed clubs, and he even started a phone hotline and website where you could give him a buzz and get advice on how to be a goalkeeper.

The website is now offline.

20. Tim Flowers - Blackburn Rovers, Leicester City, England.

Then: A fan-favourite (and Premier League winner) at Blackburn Rovers, but always seemed to be second or third choice for England.

Now: Has had a patchy spell in coaching and management, spending time at Northampton, Nottingham Forest, and Kidderminster.

21. Mark Bosnich: Aston Villa, Man United, Chelsea, Australia.

Then: Started out at Man United in the late '80s, only to be shipped off to Aston Villa where he made a name for himself, Fergie brought him back to the club in the late '90s but he didn't stay there long before moving to Chelsea.

Now: Fergie fired shots at Bosnich in his recent autobiography, labelling him a "terrible professional", the Aussie shot-stopper replied by saying Sir Alex wouldn't have bravery to say it face-to-face. Bosnich is now a pundit in Australia.

The "personal life" section of his Wikipedia page is always worth a read:

Bosnich married for the first time in 1992, to an English woman named Lisa Hall. The wedding took place in Sydney, New South Wales, in February. It was rumoured that he married Hall to be able to return to Britain, after problems with his working visa.

After two years of marriage, Home Office officials were satisfied it was not a wedding of convenience and Bosnich was allowed to remain indefinitely in Britain.

However, the marriage ended just three months later. According to him, "We were in love but our marriage just didn't work out." His second marriage was to Sarah Jarrett, in 1999. He almost failed to reach the altar, having only been released on bail hours before the wedding following an incident at a strip club during his stag night celebrations.

Every. Tasty. Video. EVER. The new Tasty app is here!

Dismiss