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12 Things To Do In 2018 To Make Your Relationships Better

Easier said than done, of course.

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BuzzFeed Brazil asked readers what the best ways are to improve a relationship. Here are the best answers:

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

2. Accept people as they really are.

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"Learn to recognize their limitations and your own, and be forgiving when expectations aren't met. Sometimes the person is actually doing the best they can within their limits. When it's not really hurting either me or the other person, it means we just need a bit of maturity and flexibility." —Ana Flávia Cézar

3. And understand that actually flawless people don't exist.

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"I've learned that perfect people don't exist, but there are people with imperfections that you can live with. For example, I could never stand relationships with dumb people and never have. My husband isn't dumb; however, he is very disorganized. That, I can live with, without fighting." —Debora Thais

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4. Stop looking at their phones!

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"Trust and privacy are very important to a relationship. Don't check the other person's cell phone, and don't force a situation where they have to show you who they're talking to. All of this will undermine your relationship bit by bit." —Romulo Gomes

5. Be vocal when it comes to giving compliments and saying what's bothering you.

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"If something bothers you, speak up! If you have compliments for them, speak up again! Want to comment on something you think is trivial? Speak! Do you have secrets or embarrassing feelings you want to share? Speak! I think the basis of a relationship is made up of a loooot of talking! It's the only way we can better understand what the other person thinks and feels about things in our everyday lives. Besides, it's through talking and opening up that we go about building a relationship of trust. This is also a way you can find out if the person you're with is in sync with the things you want out of life. This also helps you to be much more tolerant." —Gabriela Alcantara

6. Learn to communicate nonviolently.

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"Try to have heartfelt and vulnerable conversations with people, even if it means having a mini panic attack out of fear of reaction. It helped me a lot to use the principles of Nonviolent Communication, which are to:

1) Observe what I'm feeling

2) Identify what the emotion is about — without judgment or expectations placed on the other person

3) Identify what need of mine wasn't met and why I was upset/hurt/sad/happy

4) Make a clear request regarding all this to the other person.

This involves a lot of emotional vulnerability and confronting your own mistakes, too. But this way, it's easier to know what's bothering you and transform it into a clear request. You get a clearer perspective about what your relationship can be: an agreement between parties. I've become a fan and I pass it on to everyone." —Keyty Medeiros

7. Stop outsourcing your feelings.

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"Understand which part of the problem is on you. This isn't to absolve the other person of responsibility, but to recognize that the way we react to any situation varies greatly according to our experiences and personal baggage." —Nathália Rocha

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8. Respect other people's emotional frequency.

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"Going all day without talking or responding to texts doesn't always mean that something is up. Sometimes, it just means that the other person just has a different emotional frequency than you. Everything is fine; it doesn't necessarily mean that one person 'loves' the other more." —Maria Eduarda Amorim

9. And if your different frequencies are causing issues, reexamine that relationship.

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"If the other person doesn't like to listen to you (or doesn't communicate in a way compatible to your style), then it's time to seriously ask yourself if this is the right person." —Catarina Bassotti

10. Know your limits.

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"Have a clear concept of who you are, what you can tolerate, and what you like. That's the only thing that can tell you if you're with someone because you want to be, or because you're needy or scared." —Isis Rangel

11. Cherish the moments when you're alone.

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"Relationships aren't formed by two wholes that become one, but of two wholes that are shared and add something to each other. I think that once we understand this, we stop putting so much pressure and expectations on someone. After all, we're only human beings, and we have to learn to live in a relationship without negating ourselves and without invading the other person's individuality." — Nathália Rocha

12. And remember: Patience is key.

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"Be patient and think before you speak. Be willing to improve, think about the other person, and consider the relationship when you're making any kind of plans. Recognize that you make mistakes, they make mistakes, and that it's all okay, as long as we're willing to improve." —Igor Cabral

This post was translated from Portuguese.