Quixotic
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    • Quixotic

      I actually like the concept of the “sleeves” on the Belle and Jasmine bikinis. They’re impractical but if you’re okay with that, it can be a nice look. But the execution looks cheap. They’re basically just strips of fabric sewn to the sides of the tops. The top on the plus-size Snow White looks a little small on her, so out of curiosity, I went to the website to look at their sizing guide. Their largest size is listed as fitting bra sizes 34DD/36D/36DD/38D. So the sizing range is pretty limited. 38D isn’t huge.

    • Quixotic

      Most clothing is made with the average sizes and shapes of cisgender male and female bodies in mind, so if you have unusually large feet for a woman or are significantly shorter than the average man, it can be really difficult to find clothing in those departments that fit you. This is a problem for some cisgender people, too, but it’s a problem for most trans people. Most shirts from the men’s department that fit around my chest and stomach are comically large in the shoulders and arms, for example. I can’t just wear what I want. I have to shop around and alter stuff.

    • Quixotic

      Gender dysphoria is a lot deeper than whether or not you conform to gender stereotypes. As others have said, there are feminine trans men and masculine trans women. But consider how gender and sex interact in day-to-day life. When people look at someone, they determine the person’s gender based on a combination of physical characteristics (does the person have breasts? Do they have a masculine-looking face? Are they taller than the average woman?) and how they dress/groom themselves. A cis woman who wears men’s clothes will often still be read as female because people see that she has a female body. That isn’t to say that there isn’t prejudice attached to being gender-nonconforming, because their definitely is, and a lot of times it’s the same prejudice that’s directed at trans people. But for a lot of people, if they see a male-looking person in a dress or a female-looking person who’s very butch, their initial thought is “feminine man” or “masculine woman.” So if you’re a woman who dresses in a more androgynous manner or who likes stereotypically masculine things, it’s not necessarily a big people if people can see that you’re a woman. In fact, you might want them to respect that you’re a woman since being “masculine” doesn’t undermine that identity. When you’re trans and have dysphoria, however, it’s different. I have no problem with the idea of being a “masculine woman.” But I’m just not one. It’s not about how I dress. It’s about my body and how it’s interpreted. The day I first got a masculine haircut was so sad for me, because I realized afterward that it hadn’t been “just a haircut” for me—I was secretly hoping that getting my hair cut would make me look like a guy and that people would start seeing a man—or at least a very androgynous person—when they looked at me. My style is actually quite feminine. One of the reasons I’m jealous of my cis male friends is that some of them can get by with wearing women’s clothes without people misgendering them. I’d love to be able to do that.

    • Quixotic

      Biologically, hermaphroditism is when an animal has two sets of functioning sex organs. For a human, this would mean having a penis, vagina, ovaries, and testicles, and being able to both get pregnant and impregnate others. This isn’t possible in humans. Intersex conditions typically involve ambiguous/missing genitalia or chromosomal/hormonal disorders that affect sexual development. For example, individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome are genetically male but do not respond the same way to testosterone, meaning they appear female as they grow up.

    • Quixotic

      But why would I be proud of being white? I’m not ashamed of being white, but my whiteness doesn’t connect me to a courageous history of overcoming oppression, and I’m not subjected to prejudiced messages about my whiteness making me unattractive. Being white is already seen as the default in a lot of Western countries. Also, being proud of your specific culture/heritage is different than just being proud of your race. A white person can be proud of having Irish heritage, for example, without being “proud of being white.” A lot of these black pride items are also connected to specific cultural traditions, not just blackness in general (though there’s nothing wrong with general black pride, for the reasons addressed above).

    • Quixotic

      As a non-binary person, I’m uncomfortable with the idea that identifying as queer (either in terms of gender or sexuality) is more radical, inclusive, or open-minded. I’m not non-binary because I’ve somehow transcended the limits of gender. I’m non-binary because I have gender dysphoria, which actually kind of sucks. Sometimes I miss feeling like a part of the lesbian community. Being transphobic and not being attracted to trans people are two separate things that only sometimes overlap. Being attracted to one gender or sex isn’t transphobic. For some people, genitalia plays a big role in attraction. For others, it doesn’t. What’s transphobic is denying that trans women are women or making broad assumptions about whether trans people as a group are attractive based only on the fact that they’re trans.

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