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16 New Indie Songs You Need To Put On Your Playlists Right Away

You're bound to fall in love with at least one of these tunes.

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1. Wolf Alice, "Yuk Foo"

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This is unquestionably 2017's most ferocious breakup song, with Wolf Alice singer Ellie Rowsell gleefully taunting an awful ex over an abrasive punk track that can be accurately described as "2 fast, 2 furious."

2. No Joy, "Hellhole"

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"Hellhole" sounds fragile and brutal at the same time, with Jasamine White-Gluz and Laura Lloyd's airy vocal harmonies crashing into shifting planes of abrasive guitar and ambient noise.

3. Casey Dienel, "High Times"

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The most immediately striking musical element of “High Times” is the bent, sped-up string part that opens the track and loops throughout, but the main attraction is Casey Dienel's vocal performance. She starts out sounding bemused as she tells a story about hooking up with a "bordeline basic" hunk at a hotel pool in Palm Springs, but once the chorus kicks in she sounds like someone who's reveling in a newfound confidence.

4. Soccer Mommy, "Allison"

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Soccer Mommy merge the chill, suburban vibes of Real Estate with the cutting lyrics and dry affect of early Liz Phair. Sophie Allison's songwriting is remarkably elegant for a young musician, especially on this deceptively simple but heart-melting ballad.

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5. Living, "Glory"

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Living are strongly recommend if you're into Tame Impala's brand of neo-psychedelic indie rock. "Glory" is remarkably catchy and effortlessly groovy, like a classic Britpop tune with an '00s chillwave aesthetic.

6. Marika Hackman, "Boyfriend"

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If you're a fan of songs from the perspective of the "other man/woman," this one is for you. In this case, British singer-songwriter Marika Hackman is needling some guy whose girlfriend is hooking up with her on the side, and the music conveys a provocative mix of humor, sexiness, envy, and frustration.

7. The New Pornographers, "Whiteout Conditions"

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The title track from The New Pornographers' latest album is one of the darkest songs the band has ever produced, with Carl Newman and Neko Case singing about struggling to conceal anxiety and depression over an icy new wave track with a driving, nervous rhythm.

8. Rainer Maria, "Lower Worlds"

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This song from Rainer Maria's first album in over a decade breaks new ground for the emo trio, with Caithlin De Marrais' voice soaring over the most anthemic and enormous music of their career. It sounds a bit like Jane's Addiction in "Mountain Song" mode, but if Dave Navarro's guitar sounded like a buzzing overdriven organ.

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9. This Is the Kit, "Moonshine Freeze"

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“Moonshine Freeze” has a witchy feeling to it – some of it is in the odd, foreboding atmosphere of it and its melodic roots in English folk, but it’s mainly in the lyrics, which seem as though they’re outlining some sort of dark ritual as singer Kate Stables references an English clapping game for children.

10. Mount Kimbie feat. King Krule, "Blue Train Lines"

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King Krule sings “Blue Train Lines” with an urgent, frazzled tone, as though he’s trying to fill you in on as many details as he can because there’s just not enough time. His heavily accented rasp sounds like a version of Joe Strummer raised on hip-hop as he frantically spits out lines about witnessing a girlfriend trying to kill herself. Mount Kimbie’s track frames this perfectly, giving King Krule space as he sets the scene, and then a quickening pulse as the stakes get higher.

11. Bedouine, "One of These Days"

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Azniv Korkejian’s voice has a warm, calm tone that suggests perspective, serenity, and wisdom. Everything in “One of These Days” sounds measured, even, and tidy, which makes a lot of sense given that the lyrics are about patiently waiting for someone to fully return her romantic interest. There’s no trace of anxiety or fear in this, she sings every word as though she knows that this love is meant to be, and will inevitably fall into place.

12. Alvvays, "In Undertow"

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"In Undertow" isn't quite a breakup song, but it's definitely a song where a breakup seems to be on the horizon. "What's next for you and me?," Molly Rankin sings in a tone that's equally wistful and assertive. "I'll take suggestions."

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13. The Orielles, "I Only Bought It For the Bottle"

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The Orielles started off as a garage rock act, but have evolved into something more groovy and stylish on their latest singles. "I Only Bought It for the Bottle" is immediately catchy, but feels strangely off-kilter - the melodies seem to spiral around the beat as if the band is attempting to induce vertigo.

14. Cigarettes After Sex, "Apocalypse"

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Every song on Cigarettes After Sex's debut record could be described as “dreamy,” “hazy,” “romantic,” and “languid,” and the guitar parts often sound like the stuff Beach House and Mazzy Star forgot to write. The familiar vibe is more a feature than a bug, particularly as their sparkly/drifty guitars and slo-mo beats are often contrasted with a vocal melodies that are closer to contemporary pop in the vein of Lana Del Rey.

15. Laura Marling, "Nothing Not Nearly"

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Laura Marling always sounds so certain, and since so many of her songs are reflecting on something in the past, her records sound like the product of months – or even years – of quiet contemplation. “Nothing Not Nearly” is essentially a report on a romantic relationship gone right for a change. She’s recalling shared moments and little displays of affection, and coming to the conclusion that, in an otherwise dark time for her, this love is necessary and crucial.

16. Fog Lake, "Side Effects"

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The first half of Fog Lake's Dragonchaser is a space-out haze with murmured lyrics that strongly suggest the album title isn't exactly a Game of Thrones reference. "Side Effects" comes about halfway through the record and perks things up a little bit, though the lyrics are still focused on addiction and regret.

Here's a Spotify playlist with all 16 songs!

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