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Here Is 100 Years Of Hawaiian Beauty And It's Stunning As All Hell

It's so damn beautiful.

WatchCut just released the latest video in its series "100 Years of Beauty," bringing us to the beautiful island of Hawaii:

View this video on YouTube

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

In the 1910s, Princess Kaiulani was known for her beauty and intelligence, and inspired many trends during that time.

Pinterest / Via pinterest.com

Women gained the right to vote in the 1920s, but Hawaii was far from total equality, with public schools segregated based on ability to speak English.

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

In the ’30s, agriculture grew rapidly. The model below shows what local girls from tropical gardens looked like:

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

In the ’40s, Hawaii was placed under martial law after the Pearl Harbor attack, sending Americans to scatter throughout communities on Oahu. lolani Luahine (pictured on the left below) opened her home to teach people ancient hula traditions.

Pinterest / Via pinterest.com

By the ’50s, Hawaiian women were represented practicing hula in magazines, posters, and brochures.

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

In the ’60s, Hawaii became a hot spot for tourists. Elizabeth Logue became the face of this era after she appeared on the TV show Hawaii Five-O and women emulated her long flowing locks.

Pinterest / Via pinterest.com

In the ’70s, Miss Hawaii Leinaala Teruya became the face of many Hawaiian airlines, and gave us this look.

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

In the ’80s, professional surfer Rell Kapolioka'ehukai Sunn became an icon to women when she used her platform to increase breast cancer awareness. She often wore her hair back in a fishtail braid.

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

In the '90s, Na Leo became the first female Hawaiian group to make national US charts, and women often emulated their styles.

Pinterest / Via pinterest.com

The LGBT community has always been celebrated in Polynesian culture but made huge strides when famous soccer player Natasha Kai was one of three openly gay athletes on the 2008 USA Summer Olympic Team.

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

And finally, in the 2010s Hawaiian beauty and pop culture collided when Nicole Scherzinger used her fame to express her anger toward the University of Hawaii at Manoa, after it set out to build a telescope on sacred native sites. She wrote the words "WeAreMaunaKea" on her palms as a sign of protest.

WatchCut / Via youtube.com

*Books trip to Hawaii.* ✈️

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