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How Much Do You Actually Know About Heart Failure?

Learn what you don’t know about heart failure at Keep It Pumping, a Novartis sponsored heart failure awareness campaign.

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    According to the American Heart Association, “Heart failure is a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart muscle is unable to pump enough blood through to meet the body's needs for blood and oxygen. Basically, the heart can't keep up with its workload.”

    Via heart.org
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    A lower blood cell count is not a leading factor in heart failure.

    Via heart.org
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    A low-sodium diet is one of the first dietary recommendations you will get from your doctor.

    Via heart.org
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    One diagnostics test that indicates heart failure is the monitoring of brain natriuretic peptide in the blood.

    Via nhlbi.nih.gov
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    In addition to shortness of breath, swelling, and persistent cough/wheezing, lack of appetite (rather than an increased appetite) may present itself as a symptom of heart failure.

    Via heart.org
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    As of May 2014, an estimated 26 million people were affected by heart failure.

    Via escardio.org
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    An annual amount of $28.7 million is given to heart failure research while lung cancer research receives $132 million annually.

    Via hfsa.org
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    Trick question! According to the European Society of Cardiology, “Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years.”

    Via intl-europace.oxfordjournals.org
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    A 2012 study found that $108 billion was spent per year on treating heart failure.

    Via ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
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    The weight gain is due to fluid accumulation, known as congestion.

    Via heartfailurematters.org
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    Good news! There are several options to help manage heart failure. Ask your doctor about which options are right for you or your loved one.

Illustrations by Dan Blaushild / BuzzFeed

Don’t fail your heart or the heart of a loved one — continue learning about heart failure at Keep It Pumping, a Novartis sponsored heart failure awareness campaign.

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