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This Movie Aims To Change Unrealistic Size Standards In The Media

Straight/Curve advocates for more size diversity in the fashion industry.

Say hello to Jenny McQuaile, Franses Simonovich, and Jess Lewis.

They're currently in the process of filming Straight/Curve, a documentary about diversity and inclusivity in the modeling world.

Through interviews with models, photographers, writers, and stylists, Straight/Curve hopes to advocate for more realistic representations of women in mainstream media.

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Interviewees include models Denise Bidot and Sabina Karlsson, model and stylist Felicity Hayward, designer and model Georgia Pratt, and photographer Antoine Verglas.

"My background is in journalism," McQuaile, the film's director, tells BuzzFeed Life. "For years I wrote about [only] skinny women 'looking sexy' at the behest of my male editors."

"More women are running media now, and are [listening] to what their readers want... to see themselves." This includes thin women, McQuaile emphasizes, but isn't limited to them.
Facebook: straightcurvefilm

"More women are running media now, and are [listening] to what their readers want... to see themselves."

This includes thin women, McQuaile emphasizes, but isn't limited to them.

"I have personally suffered from a negative body image," says McQuaile. "It took me until I was 30 to feel [body confident] and I don't want any other girl or woman to feel that."

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"We need to stop pitting women against each other, we need to stop talking about plus-size 'promoting obesity,' and we need to stop accepting designer's excuses of why they don't make plus-size samples," she says. "We need to demand answers."

"The models, agents, stylists and designers I have met are all striving to fight for change in this industry," McQuaile tells BuzzFeed Life. "They want to give the public what they deserve."
Facebook: straightcurvefilm

"The models, agents, stylists and designers I have met are all striving to fight for change in this industry," McQuaile tells BuzzFeed Life. "They want to give the public what they deserve."

Once Straight/Curve is completed, McQuaile and her team hope it will be used as an educational tool. They're already working with both governmental and non-governmental organizations to make sure that happens.

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"We want to empower the next generation of girls to embrace their bodies and not let body image stand in the way of greatness and reaching their life's goals," she says.

But this all relies on adequate funds, which McQuaile is raising through Kickstarter. "I think people see the big names we have attached to the documentary... and think we will have no problem getting funded," McQuaile says, "but this is not true."

If enough money is raised, Straight/Curve should be completed by autumn 2016. You can watch the entire trailer here.

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