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Food

17 Impossibly Cool Inventions That'll Change The Way You Eat

Warning: Will induce HUNGER.

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1. Kuvée ($180 to pre-order) is a smart wine bottle that accepts wine "cartridges" with special valves. The cartridges are designed to keep wine fresh for up to 30 days.

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I had the chance to try Kuvée and impress all of my friends.

The cartridges have an RFID tag built into the caps, so that when they're inserted into the smart bottle, a label, information about the winemakers, and details about the wine appear. You can also order more wine using the onscreen store and view what wines you've tried.

What's neat about Kuvée is that you can serve all kinds of vino — rosé, cab sauvignon, sauvignon blanc, Riesling — without worrying about which bottle you're opening. The valve doesn't allow any air to be introduced, so you can pour yourself a glass without technically opening the bottle.

A week after opening the wine, my mefo and I retasted the bottles (and got a lil' tipsy in the process).

Our thoughts were mixed: Some of the wines kept well, while others didn't. According to Kuvée, I was the unfortunate recipient of defective valves and that when the device and wines ship in October, the issue should be resolved.

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2. Flatev ($250–$300) is billing itself as the Keurig of tortillas.

Flatev

Have you ever eaten tacos with freshly made tortillas before? They are DAMN good.

Using dough pods, this machine promises to whip up fresh corn tortillas in a matter of minutes. Flatev will eventually expand to naan, lavash, pita, arepa, and other forms of flatbread. It really *is* a gadget of the future, since the Flatev won't be available until summer 2017.

3. Edible Cutlery ($10 for 100) hopes to reduce the insane amount of waste generated by plastic forks and spoons.

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A company called Bakeys hopes to create more spoons made of rice, wheat, and sorghum (they've already sold 1.5 million in India). The fully edible, biodegrable cutlery is intended to support the millions of fast food restaurants around the world that either service plastic utensils or corn-based compostable utensils that actually take a very long time to degrade.

After you're finished with your meal, you can end it with the crunch of your spoon, or throw it away for decomposing. How does it taste? The spoons currently come in favors such as sugar, ginger cinnamon, cumin, celery, and carrot-beetroot.

You can pre-order the spoons on Kickstarter or purchase in India from their website.

4. Cinder ($189) is a smart grill that can cook the "perfect" steak.

This grill, which will ship summer 2016, is like George Foreman's Lean Mean Machine, all grown up.

Through the app, you can set how you'd like your steak cooked (medium, rare, etc.) and Cinder will notify you when it's done. The grill's cooking plates are heated to the temperature of the steak, so that it cooks the meat evenly throughout.

5. PancakeBot ($300) prints flat breakfast wonders in any shape.

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The modified 3D printer dispenses batter right onto a hot griddle, so it cooks while you watch robot art in action. There's an entire library of printable art to choose from, too.

6. Scroll ($7) is a silicone accessory that peels garlic as you roll it.

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So, OK, it doesn't have an app or connect to Wi-Fi, but it does PEEL YOUR CLOVES, somehow, by magic, which is just as impressive as a smart oven to me.

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7. June ($1,495 to pre-order) is an oven with a built-in camera that detects what's inside to offer cooking suggestions.

June

Speaking of smart ovens: June can, for example, detect cookies and suggest you bake them for 12 minutes at 325 degrees. There's also a steel probe for more complicated recipes, like roast chicken.

The Wi-Fi enabled oven, slated to ship December 2016, can notify you when the timer's up, so you don't have to keep checking on it. You can also watch your food from the app as it cooks, which is either incredible or torturous (or both).

8. Impossible Foods (TBD) is making a veggie, plant-based burger for meat lovers.

Impossible Foods

The secret to making a burger taste like meat? Blood. Well, blood-like molecules.

Impossible Foods discovered that a molecule called heme is what makes meat so tasty to omnivores and carnivores. Protein with heme, evidently, can also be found in plants and it's those plant-based molecules that Impossible Foods is using to craft a veggie burger that sizzles, looks, and tastes like its animal counterpart.

The company hopes to bring its first Impossible Burger to market by the end of 2016.

9. Tovala ($200 to pre-order, $330 retail) is a smart oven *and* meal delivery service.

Tovala will deliver cold-packed, scannable meals to your doorstep every week, based on what you select in the app.

This oven scans the barcode on each meal, then perfectly steams, bakes, broils, and/or convection heats it to the chef's liking, because we literally can't be trusted to do anything ourselves (including pressing buttons).

You can also cook your own foods, and use Tovala's wet and dry heating capabilities to experiment. For example, you can try steaming veggies for a bit, then broil them for a barbecued effect. Through the app, you can also save your favorite presets/combinations.

11. Click and Grow ($60) is a dummy-proof way to grow fresh herbs or fruit.

Click and Grow

This high-tech indoor gardening station has an LED grow lamp that automatically turns itself on for 16 hours a day, the ideal amount of light for fast growth. The large reservoir holds up to one month of water and the soil is nutrient rich so your plants can thrive. Click and Grow offers various refills like tomatoes, oregano, basil, tea leaves, strawberries, and more.

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12. Livin Farms ($649) is an at-home hive for edible, um, insects.

Livin Farms

This hive can offer the same amount of protein as beef via mealworms that can be fed with your excess food scraps. It's allegedly a much more sustainable source of sustenance than beef, since it uses significantly less land, less food, and less water. Yum?

13. This Butter Mill ($30) makes cold butter soft and spreadable.

Butter tech is so hot (er, cold?) right now! As a butter-loving kid whose parents insisted on keeping it in the fridge, I could have never imagined such a thing, even in my dream of dreams, and yet *here it is.*

14. Biem ($129 to pre-order), another butter gadget, turns sticks into spray.

Biem

Spraying butter is faster than spreading it, plus it allows you to grease pans without overdoing it. It will last about one week on a single charge and melts only the butter you need.

Biem is slated to ship later this year, with an estimated delivery date for current backers of September 2016.

15. Coravin ($300) pumps argon gas into a wine bottle as you pour, preserving it for years.

Coravin

It's the same idea as the Kuvée, except it can open a wine bottle without oxidation for years instead of a month. Coravin's thin needle pierces the cork, which pours the wine and introduces argon gas to prevent oxidation. Natural cork is self-healing, so when you pull out the Coravin it's as if you've never opened the bottle at all.

But it isn't cheap. The first generation is $300 while the second generation is $350. The argon gas capsules are about $30 for 3.

16. Drop ($90) is a connected scale that works with an app, so you make cocktails or baked goods without a problem.

Drop

The app can help you work with weird proportions, halving or doubling (or even tripling) recipes without destroying the taste. It can even rescale entire recipes based on how much of the ingredient you have and offer substitutions.

17. And, finally, there's the Philips Noodle Maker ($387), which can produce unlimited amounts of fresh homemade ramen!!!!

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No kneading required — just mix the ingredients and you'll get fresh noodles in 10 to 15 minutes. Need ideas? Check out the Noodler app.

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