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Non-Rich People Are Sharing What They Learned From Being Around The Wealthy, And It's Eye-Opening

"If parents solve their kids' problems with money, it's generally a band-aid solution, and a bigger problem is always on the horizon."

We all know that regular folks lead very different lives than the ultra-rich.

Fox

Well, Reddit user u/CrookedGoodridge197 recently asked, "What does one learn from being exposed to the wealthy?"

CBC

And there were so many interesting answers! Here are some of the top-voted responses:

1. "I've worked with the very wealthy and the very poor. I have learned that money makes you MORE of whatever you are. People who are kind and generous are kind and generous on a larger scale. People who are jerks become jerks on a bigger scale."

u/czndra67

2. "The wealthy spend money to save time versus spending time to save money."

u/Soloflow786

"I’ve met people before who do not consider parking tickets to be a penalty. They just mean 'It costs $50 to park there.'"

u/TogarSucks

3. "If parents solve their kids' problems with money, it's generally a bandage solution, and a bigger problem is always on the horizon."

u/reflect-the-sun

4. "That no amount of money will buy your way out of dealing with your insecurities."

u/CopingMole

Woman looking in the mirror
Dougal Waters / Getty Images

5. "The few real folks among them will tell you how lucky they are to be wealthy. They realize that many folks have brilliant ideas, many folks work hard...yet aren't that fortunate."

u/rhinoheader

6. "I'm working with a guy who owns an extraordinary number of houses, land, and a couple of mansions. I soon realized he has everything but no time to enjoy it."

u/Efexist

7. "People think they can spot the rich guy based on stereotypes. But I know very rich people who drive old cars, shop at thrift shops, and donate regularly (anonymously). They don’t flaunt their wealth."

u/gouf78

"My parents would always warn me our neighbors were not rich, but deep in debt. They gave their kids everything, always had brand-new things, and acted rich. They went broke in the early '00s and lost it all."

u/Lozzif

8. "Just how comfortable a life with financial security is. While many poor people are grinding every day, knowing any little mistake or piece of dumb luck can completely ruin their finances, rich people go to bed easy every night, knowing how secure they are."

"That's why I want to get wealthy in my lifetime. Not to have an extravagant lifestyle or run with the high rollers, but to just go to bed every night, not worrying about losing my income."

u/putcoolusernamehere

"I have a lot of wealthy clients, and the things they don't have to worry about is amazing. Money can buy so much peace of mind."

u/TheVudoThatIdo

Woman sleeping in bed
Tetra Images / Getty Images

9. "Even the moderately wealthy, like the upper middle class, have 'a guy' for everything. And not just a sketchy guy, but a tailored professional. Maybe they bump into each other at country clubs and form reciprocal agreements, IDK. But it results in wealthy people getting the highest quality service on everything for a family and friends discount. You have money = you save money = you get more money."

u/bingley777

10. "That a lot of successful people have rich parents."

u/peanutanniversary

"Kids of wealthy parents get wealthy themselves in three ways: 1) inheriting wealth directly, 2) having greater investment in their education, and 3) just getting better career advice. 1 receives all the political attention, 2 does a bit, but 3 is hardly ever mentioned. And I think we could have massive benefits from just educating kids from poor areas about what their options are and what they could be ambitious about."

u/DemocraticRepublic

11. "How much closer the upper middle class is to poverty than it is to the wealthy."

u/robbybuttons

12. "That you can be cashflow rich and balance sheet poor. That becoming wealthy isn't as much about massive income as it is about consistent saving and investing over time. That acting rich generally means you're poor or soon-to-be."

u/basedlandchad14

A man opening an empty wallet
Getty Images/EyeEm

13. "Mostly, I've learned they can make moral or ethical stands because there are no consequences. Unhappy at a job and think they are wrong? Just quit. No true repercussions for doing so."

"I knew a guy who argued that staying somewhere you felt was ethically or morally corrupt was a choice, and he had walked out of a job because of it. But he could move back home. He had his wealthy parents. He was never sacrificing his home, his car, his family, nothing, except he might have to hang out with his parents. It was really eye-opening to me. No fear of repercussions except Mom and Dad would have to help."

u/Sawigirl

14. "Who you know goes a lot farther than what you know."

u/imac132

15. "Not how much THEY have, but just how LITTLE you have. They put no thought into buying a $1,500 espresso maker that they never use because Starbucks is easier...But for me, Starbucks is an expensive treat."

u/fucovid2020

16. And finally, "That there is no end to human greed, and no amount of money ever seems to be enough."

u/journey_j

Man counting cash
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Have you learned anything by being around wealthy people? LMK in the comments below!

Some responses have been edited for length and/or clarity.

17.

Cbs Photo Archive / CBS via Getty Images

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18.

Catherine Mcqueen / Getty Images

$600 in $100 bills