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    Non-Americans Are Sharing Aspects Of American Culture They Can't Stand, And Points Were Made

    "I found it weird that people were so loyal to companies that treated them so badly."

    Recently, Reddit user u/-ThatGingerKid- asked the question: "Non-Americans of Reddit who have come to/lived in America, what is something about American culture that took getting used to for you?"

    Comedy Central

    Here are some of the eye-opening responses:

    1. "The way people view paid holidays, sick leave, and maternity leave. When I talk about it with some people, they make it out like anyone who expects it is a lazy freeloader."

    u/wash_your_rice

    2. "The portion sizes. I ordered a large drink, and I swear I was handed a bucket."

    u/jman857

    3. "The gaps in the public toilet doors!!"

    Pop TV

    4. "When they say, 'How are you?' but you aren’t really supposed to answer."

    "So now you have two options: You either try to be polite, answer them, and then ask them the same thing back...but then it becomes awkward like you are taking up their time now. Or ignore the question and feel like a jerk for the rest of the day."

    u/MachiavellianMacaron

    5. "The many ways companies try to get more money out of you. A 'convenience fee' for paying by card. If you don't have a lot of money, then bank accounts charge you for transactions and ATM withdrawals so that just makes you poorer."

    u/Mustardly

    6. "Flags. Jesus Christ — enough with the fucking flags!"

    Comedy Central

    7. "Plastic surgery advertisements and medication advertisements were really weird to me."

    u/Moofypoops

    8. "Added sugar in everything. Bread, cereals. It's not normal where I live to have cereal with sugar."

    u/Floor_sitter

    9. "As a Brit, not being able to walk outside with a beer."

    New Line Cinema

    "I was staying at a hostel and having a few pre-drinks for a night out. I walked out of the hostel with a few people to go to a bar, and I took my beer with me. Everyone insisted I leave it in the hostel as I could get in serious trouble for walking down the street with a can of beer."

    u/rideshotgun

    10. "Misleading advertisement. Within a week of arriving in the US, I discovered that my phone plan with 'unlimited data' was only unlimited up to 100MB. I had to start reading the fine print on everything."

    u/make_onions_cry

    11. "The definition of dating. WTF? Dating could mean casual, serious but not committed, being a couple officially, etc."

    u/frescafrescacool

    12. "Work/life balance. Working six days a week and being proud of only using four of the 10 holiday days you get per year. I found it weird that people were so loyal to companies that treated them so badly."

    ITV

    13. "Tipping. Just pay your damn staff already."

    u/elgigantedelsur

    14. "That Americans really don't seem to understand that other countries have things. For example, a Mainer kept going on and on about maple syrup, like he was telling me something new. I just smiled along while thinking, 'Does he NOT know that Canada produces the majority of the supply of maple syrup?'"

    u/Ecollide

    15. "The corporately forced fakeness of service personnel. They have to smile and be polite when you can sense they’re dying inside."

    Universal

    16. "The amount of water in the toilet?????? Why is there so much? WHY?"

    "Also, isn’t that a little weird? Just doing a poop, and it’s so close to your ass? Seriously. It’s very...frightening. I’m guessing it has something to do with making the toilet easier to clean."

    u/UnsavouryPie

    17. And finally, "The healthcare system is theft."

    What do you think about these aspects of American culture? Let me know in the comments below!

    Some submissions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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