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    All Of Hollywood History In Lego Form

    Check out Lego master Alex Eylar's amazing creations side-by-side with the movie stills that inspired them.

    The Lego Movie was a huge hit earlier this year, grossing more than $442 million worldwide.

    Warner Bros./Village Roadshow

    But what if every movie in cinema history were made with Lego? According to Lego master Alex Eylar, it'd look something like this:

    The Great Train Robbery, 1903

    Flickr: hoyvinmayvin / Via Creative Commons
    hollywood.com

    This 12 minute silent film was one of the very first blockbusters.

    The Birth of a Nation, 1915

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    Epoch Producing Company

    D.W. Griffith's Civil War era epic was blatantly racist, but pioneered many filmmaking techniques still used today.

    Safety Last!, 1923

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    Pathé Exchange

    Comedy legend Harold Lloyd starred in this romantic comedy which was added to The Library of Congress' National Film Registry in 1994.

    The Phantom of the Opera, 1925

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    Universal Pictures

    "The Man of a Thousand Faces," Lon Chaney, starred in what was one of the first horror films to become a hit.

    City Lights, 1931

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    United Artists

    Charlie Chaplin wrote, directed, and starred in what the American Film Institute (AFI) called the greatest romantic comedy of all time in 2008.

    Duck Soup, 1933

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    Paramount Pictures

    This classic is widely regarded as the best film ever made by the legendary comic team, The Marx Brothers.

    It Happened One Night, 1934

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    Columbia Pictures

    The screwball comedy won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Director (Frank Capra), Actor (Clark Gable), Actress (Claudette Colbert), and Screenplay.

    Gone With The Wind, 1939

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    MGM

    An epic romance set in the 19th century South, it won 10 Academy Awards and is still the highest grossing film of all time when adjusted for inflation.

    Suspicion, 1941

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    RKO Radio Pictures

    Legendary director Alfred Hitchcock directed Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine in this acclaimed psychological thriller.

    Casablanca, 1942

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    wordpress.com

    Humphrey Bogart starred in this romantic drama famous for the classic lines "Play it (again), Sam," "Here's looking at you, kid," and "We'll always have Paris."

    Singing In The Rain, 1952

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    MGM

    AFI selected this Gene Kelly classic as film's greatest musical.

    Psycho, 1960

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    Paramount/Universal

    The shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's horror favorite is among the most iconic in film history.

    Dr. No, 1962

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    United Artists

    This was the first of 23 films to be made about the British secret agent, James Bond.

    2001: A Space Odyssey, 1968

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    Warner Bros.

    Legendary filmmaker Stanley Kubrick wrote and directed this prescient sci-fi film.

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969

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    20th Century Fox

    Paul Newman and Robert Redford starred in this Western loosely based on real life outlaws Robert LeRoy Parker and his partner Harry Longabaugh.

    The Godfather, 1972

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    Paramount Pictures

    Francis Ford Coppola's mafia epic won Best Picture at the Oscars and spawned two sequels, parts II and III.

    The Exorcist, 1973

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    Warner Bros.

    Entertainment Weekly named this supernatural horror film the scariest movie of all time.

    Chinatown, 1974

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    Paramount Pictures

    Jack Nicholson starred in this mystery about the seedy underbelly of early 20th century Los Angeles. "Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."

    Star Wars, 1977

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    20th Century Fox

    George Lucas' landmark film was actually Episode IV of a nine part series that will be completed in 2020.

    Raging Bull, 1980

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    United Artists

    Martin Scorsese directed frequent collaborator Robert De Niro in this biopic about former World Middleweight Champion Jake LaMotta.

    Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981

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    Paramount Pictures

    Harrison Ford is now synonymous with Indiana Jones, but the role was originally offered to Tom Selleck, who was too busy with Magnum P.I. to accept.

    Scarface, 1983

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    Universal Pictures

    The famous line, "Say hello to my little friend," was growled by Al Pacino as drug kingpin Tony Montana in this highly influential crime saga.

    Back To The Future, 1985

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    Universal Pictures

    Michael J. Fox starred as the time traveling Marty McFly in this film and its two sequels, but only after the original Marty, Eric Stotz, was fired.

    Die Hard, 1988

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    Bruce Willis starred as NYPD cop John McClane in what is easily the most imitated action film of the last thirty years.

    The Silence of the Lambs, 1991

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    Orion Pictures

    The Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster scarer was the first horror film to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards.

    Pulp Fiction, 1994

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    Miramax

    This is the signature film of writer/director Quentin Tarantino, and revived the career of John Travolta.

    The Big Lebowski, 1998

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    Gramercy Pictures

    The Coen Brothers' cult classic has spawned "Lebowski Fest," an annual festival dedicated to all things pertaining to The Dude, White Russians, and bowling.

    American Beauty, 1999

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    Dreamworks Pictures

    Winner of five Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Director (Sam Mendes), Best Actor (Kevin Spacey), and Best Screenplay (Alan Ball).

    Billy Elliot, 2000

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    Universal Focus

    A musical adapted from this film about an 11-year-old aspiring male dancer won ten prizes, including Best Musical, at the 2009 Tony Awards.

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, 2002

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    Warner Bros.

    This was the second of eight films adapted from the hit books by J.K. Rowling.

    Inglourious Basterds, 2009

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    The Weinstein Company/Universal

    Quentin Tarantino won his second Academy Award for this WWII revenge fantasy.

    Blue Valentine, 2010

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    The Weinstein Company

    Ryan Gosling sang and played the ukelele opposite Michelle Williams in this Sundance hit about the dissolution of a relationship.

    127 Hours, 2010

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    Fox Searchlight

    James Franco played real-life hiker Aron Ralston, who went to extreme measures to survive after his arm became trapped under a boulder in remote Utah.

    The Kids Are All Right, 2010

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    Focus Features

    Annette Bening and Julianne Moore played a lesbian couple struggling to keep their family together in this Best Picture nominee.

    Inception, 2010

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    Warner Bros.

    Christopher Nolan's brain twister starring Leonardo Dicaprio grossed more than 800 million worldwide, and won 4 Academy Awards.

    Amazing work, Alex! You deserve an Oscar (made out of Lego, of course).

    Flickr: hoyvinmayvin / Via Creative Commons

    You can check out more of Alex's work here.

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