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People Are Sharing Effective Psychological Tricks They Use In Everyday Life, And I'm Blown Away By Some

"On an airplane, if my seatmate is hogging the armrest or being too chatty, I pick up the barf bag. Works every time."

We all face stressful or emotional situations in our everyday lives — whether it's an argument with a friend or partner, or a toxic colleague bringing everything down. And if you're lucky, you might have a surefire tip or trick to deal with these scenarios.

NBC

Well, Reddit user u/PM_ME_UR_PUPPYDOGS asked, "What is the most effective psychological 'trick' you use?" — and the answers are super interesting.

1. "To avoid workplace drama and be liked, compliment people behind their back."

Asian and white co-worker eating lunch in office cafeteria.
Marko Geber / Getty Images

2. "Saying 'You're right!' instead of 'I know' makes you look less like an asshole and doesn't diminish something someone else may have just found out."

u/FantomUnicorn

3. "On an airplane, if my seatmate is hogging the armrest or being too chatty, I grab the barf bag. Works every time."

Young woman breathing into a vomit bag while seated in economy class seat
Solstock / Getty Images

4. "Instead of asking, 'Do you have any questions?' I ask, 'What questions do you have?' The first almost always results in silence, while the second helps people feel comfortable asking questions."

u/MediocrePaladin

5. "Put headphones in and play the music that fits your hoped-for mood. It shifts me over to it mentally.

Younger woman listening to music on headphones, while sitting on a white sofa in breezy-looking room
Asiavision / Getty Images

"It really helps when I need to calm down or when I need to feel happier."

u/sunflowersfornudes

6. "I work in an office. When people stop by my desk and refuse to leave me alone, I get up and refill my water bottle while they are talking to me. Instead of walking back to my desk, I walk them to theirs. They instinctively will sit down. Then I just sever the conversation and get back to work."

u/Electricpants

7. "My 4-year-old got into the 'Why?' phase a little while back. I read an article that said the best way to get them to stop was to ask them, 'I'm not sure, what do you think?' It is a godsend.

Asian mother talking to her toddler, while sitting on a stone bench in the park
Tang Ming Tung / Getty Images

"They answer their own question, you provide some feedback, and they immediately move on. Fucking awesome."

u/AD_Meridian

8. "When you're in an argument, find something to agree on, then push your main point."

u/bobvella

9. "If you need to deescalate someone and get them to communicate, ask them questions about numbers or personal information.

Angry man throwing his tablet on the floor
Westend61 / Getty Images

"I work in emergency services. If someone is totally distraught and shut down, asking their phone number, address, Social Security number, or birth date can pull them out of an emotional place and bring them back to a headspace where they can talk about what happened more easily. I often ask these questions even after I have the information, just to deescalate."

u/Orpheus91

10. "Thank someone for a trait you want them to have.

"Instead of telling a customer you’re sorry for the wait, tell them, 'Thank you for your patience or understanding.' Works wonders."

u/Hasp3

11. "Be direct and personal when you need things. Instead of asking IF anyone has an EpiPen, ask WHO has an EpiPen.

Young man lending a pen to a colleague behind him sitting who is sitting in front of a desktop computer
Georgijevic / Getty Images

"Instead of saying, 'Someone call 911,' point to someone and say, 'Go call 911 and come tell me when they are on the way.'"

u/Polyfuckery

12. "I currently manage around 240 people among six restaurants. It is often hard to get them to do what is needed. I have found that saying, 'I need your help' is effective in getting them on board. People want to feel needed and that they are making a difference.

Four restaurant colleagues talking in a friendly manner in the kitchen
10'000 Hours / Getty Images

"Expressing that need to them as much as possible makes all the difference in the world."

u/aaronmicook

13. "When I have something important to say to my kids, I say it very quietly so that they listen. They're immune to my yelling, but whispering gets their attention."

u/LastUsernameAvail

14. "If you look happy to see someone every time you see them, they will eventually be happy to see you."

Three Latinx women smiling at the camera outside their home
Courtney Hale / Getty Images

15. "Listen to someone without giving advice or asking for more information. This typically gets me more information than if I were to be pushy about it."

u/Drewby5

16. "If you're trying to pick out dinner with your partner, rather than ask, 'What do you want?' and getting the typical 'I don't know, anything' answer and then having suggestions shot down, start with, 'What do you NOT want?'

Two partners sitting on floor while eating delivery pizza out of a box
Johner Images / Getty Images

"Used it a few times in some of my relationships, and it's the godsend question."

u/FartKilometre

17. "To deescalate a situation or someone who is prone to violence, address them at one or two emotional levels below where they are. For example, If their anger is at a level 10, then you should come in at a level 8. Being completely calm, reserved, and polite only pisses people off more because you 'clearly don't understand the magnitude of the situation.'

"If they are screaming and yelling, you need to come in loud — while not attacking them, and agreeing with them (to a point). When you agree with their anger, they are more open to listening to you. Works pretty much every time, though there may be a little up and down in the middle. Just follow the person's lead, while always being a level below them."

u/Cardfan60123

18. "Say hello to everybody you know, and say it with a smile. Just imagine: If someone walks into you twice a year and both times you smile and greet them enthusiastically, they will think of you as a nice person. So little effort for a person to find you friendly!"

Queen waving out of a sleek black car
Robin Utrecht / Getty Images

19. "When I do something bothersome to my husband and he goes quiet, I wait a few minutes and then ask him a seemingly innocent question, usually on the subject of how certain parts of a car works. This gets him talking about the car thing and he rambles for like five minutes, and then, bam! He’s happy again and not quietly brooding.

"I’ll never tell him I do this because I’m afraid it won’t work anymore if he knows about it. It’s foolproof, though; it works every single time, no matter how bothered he is."

u/alskdjfhgtk

20. "When somebody shy is speaking, if you look at them and nod your head, it encourages them to keep talking."

A Black therapist smiling calmly at a patient, who has her back turned to the camera
SDI Productions / Getty Images

21. "I’m a professional poker player. When I am in a pot with one other player, I often try to make them laugh when they are thinking about what to do. If you can get them to laugh, it sets them in a mood where they are unlikely to bluff."

u/Amo4sho4sho

22. "I work with a bunch of idiot lawyers, and I use the phrase 'You’re correct' all the time. Even if it’s one teeny, tiny thing they’re correct about, it makes them feel smart and they instantly soften. It also keeps them listening because they’re hoping more flattery will come down the pike."

Room full of professionals wearing business outfits in a large conference room, talking in small groups
Sanjeri / Getty Images

23. "My husband says, 'I will give you $50 if you hiccup two more times.' It works amazingly well — he's never had to pay me."

u/toxik0n

Note: Some responses have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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