TVAndMovies

The Director Of "Beauty and the Beast" Weighed In On LeFou Being Gay

Bill Condon weighs in on the "exclusively gay moment" that's become the talk of the internet.

Posted on

Unless you've been turned into common household object and have been forced to live life in a drafty old castle in France, you've probably heard that Disney's Beauty and the Beast is getting the live-action treatment.

Last week, director Bill Condon revealed in an interview with Attitude that the film would make history with Disney's first “exclusively gay moment.”

Valerie Macon / AFP / Getty Images

In the interview, Condon went on to say the beloved character LeFou (Josh Gad) "is somebody who on one day wants to be Gaston and on another day wants to kiss Gaston."

He also said: "It may have been a long time coming but this is a watershed moment for Disney. ... By representing same-sex attraction in this short but explicitly gay scene, the studio is sending out a message that this is normal and natural – and this is a message that will be heard in every country of the world, even countries where it’s still socially unacceptable or even illegal to be gay."

In the film, LeFou doesn't make any statements whatsoever about his sexuality.

At the end of the movie, there is a brief moment where LeFou is dancing with another man (who'd previously been put in traditionally feminine clothing), and people have taken that as a subtle indication that Gad's character is gay. But in reality, there is no in-your-face "I am gay" moment. Gad even told USA Today that his character's sexuality wasn't mentioned in the script.

After a ton of hype, Erin Whitney at Screen Crush asked Condon about LeFou's sexuality, which he said has "all been overblown."

Jeff Spicer / Getty Images

Here's Condon's full quote on the matter: "Oh God. Can I just tell you? It’s all been overblown. Because it’s just this, it’s part of just what we had fun with. You saw the movie, yeah? You know what I mean. I feel like the kind of thing has been, I wish it were — I love the way it plays pure when people don’t know and it comes as a nice surprise."

And when asked how he'd like audiences to approach the film with all the questions surrounding queer representation, he said: "To not make a big deal of it. Why is it a big deal?"