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Margot Robbie Told Chris Pratt All About Filming "I, Tonya" And The Epic Swearing

Turns out Tonya Harding never actually said one of the rudest things in the film.

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On Monday night, Margot Robbie stopped by Jimmy Kimmel Live!, doing the rounds for her upcoming movie I, Tonya, which comes out on Friday.

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The film is a biopic about Tonya Harding, one of the most popular figure skaters of the early '90s, whose career ended in scandal when she was caught up in the events surrounding the 1994 attack on her skating rival, Nancy Kerrigan. Harding was subsequently banned from the US Figure Skating Association for life.

Chris Pratt acted as a guest host for the episode (Kimmel's young son is recovering from surgery) and got Robbie to dish on her upbringing in Australia, her affinity for beer, and the fact that she's never *gasp* eaten at an Outback Steakhouse.

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Robbie also dropped a few gems about I, Tonya. For instance, she dished about one particular scene where her character tells a judge off after rude comments are made about her skating attire.

In the scene, the judge says that in addition to technical skill, figure skaters are also judged on presentation. As a frustrated Tonya skates away, the judge says, "Maybe you're just not as good as you think. Maybe you should pick another sport."

Robbie revealed that the real Tonya Harding didn't actually say that line, but when Harding saw a screening of the film she said that she "loved" it and wished she'd said it.

Robbie also noted that the idea to tell the film from multiple points of view came after screenwriter Steven Rogers interviewed both Harding and her ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly. "Both their stories contradicted each other so much that [Rogers] thought it was the best way to tell the story," she said, essentially letting the audience decide the truth for themselves.

Naturally, the topic of preparing for the athletic portion of the role came up and Robbie said that she trained for four to five months, working five days a week for at least three hours a day.

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But that's "nothing compared to what an Olympic-level ice skater does," said Robbie.

Michael Blackmon is an entertainment writer with BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Michael Blackmon at michael.blackmon@buzzfeed.com.

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