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16 Foods You Must Try In Mexico City

There's actually more to it than just street tacos and Coronas.

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1. Chapulines (deep-fried grasshoppers)

In Mexico City, deep-fried grasshoppers are served at the table like a condiment to sprinkle on just about anything, even chips and guacamole.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

In Mexico City, deep-fried grasshoppers are served at the table like a condiment to sprinkle on just about anything, even chips and guacamole.

2. Fresh Ceviche at Condesa DF Hotel

The rooftop restaurant at Condesa DF Hotel serves some of the freshest ceviche in town, tossed with sliced mango and melon then topped with a dollop of avocado puree. Beyond its sushi menu, the restaurant offers incredible views of the surrounding Condesa neighborhood.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

The rooftop restaurant at Condesa DF Hotel serves some of the freshest ceviche in town, tossed with sliced mango and melon then topped with a dollop of avocado puree. Beyond its sushi menu, the restaurant offers incredible views of the surrounding Condesa neighborhood.

3. Anything with Talla Sauce at Fonda Fina

A decadent blend of roasted chilies, Talla Sauce originates from Guerrero, Mexico just two hours inland from Acapulco. Savory and lightly spicy the sauce is like a party in your mouth only better. And the food at Fonda Fina definitely brings the party (sans piñata).
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

A decadent blend of roasted chilies, Talla Sauce originates from Guerrero, Mexico just two hours inland from Acapulco. Savory and lightly spicy the sauce is like a party in your mouth only better. And the food at Fonda Fina definitely brings the party (sans piñata).

4. Café de Olla

Mexican spiced coffee is the best way to start the day. While in Mexico City, why have just a regular cup of Joe when you can have your morning brew carefully steeped in cinnamon, raw brown sugar, and orange peels?
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Mexican spiced coffee is the best way to start the day. While in Mexico City, why have just a regular cup of Joe when you can have your morning brew carefully steeped in cinnamon, raw brown sugar, and orange peels?

5. Mezcal Neat from Santa Pedrera

Mezcal is tequila's artisan cousin. Derived from smoked agave, mezcal is perhaps one of Mexico City's most carefully crafted adult beverages best sipped solo to savor the full flavor profile. It takes nine years for Santa Pedrera's agave to reach maturity before it is pulverized with a donkey-pulled stone mill then distilled.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Mezcal is tequila's artisan cousin. Derived from smoked agave, mezcal is perhaps one of Mexico City's most carefully crafted adult beverages best sipped solo to savor the full flavor profile. It takes nine years for Santa Pedrera's agave to reach maturity before it is pulverized with a donkey-pulled stone mill then distilled.

6. Mezcal Aerated Through a Bamboo Tube

Similar to decanting wine, aerating Mezcal enhances its flavor profile. During a tasting with Santa Pedrera , a mezcal expert sucks the spirit into a bamboo straw then releases it into the glass.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Similar to decanting wine, aerating Mezcal enhances its flavor profile. During a tasting with Santa Pedrera , a mezcal expert sucks the spirit into a bamboo straw then releases it into the glass.

7. Cocktails with Worm Salt Rims at Distrito Capital Hotel

Known as Sal de Gusano, worm salt is made of -- you guessed it -- worms. Extracted from the agave plant, the worms are dehydrated, compressed, then combined with chiles and salt to add a tangy and savory rim to a cocktail glass that actually doesn't taste like worms at all. At Distrito Capital Hotel's swanky rooftop bar, try it with a mango margarita.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Known as Sal de Gusano, worm salt is made of -- you guessed it -- worms. Extracted from the agave plant, the worms are dehydrated, compressed, then combined with chiles and salt to add a tangy and savory rim to a cocktail glass that actually doesn't taste like worms at all. At Distrito Capital Hotel's swanky rooftop bar, try it with a mango margarita.

8. Pulque at Pulquería Los Insurgentes

Known as the Aztec drink of the gods, pulque has made a resurgence over the years in Mexico. Actually more delicious than it sounds, Pulque combines fermented agave sap with different flavors like mango, coconut, or guava. Pull up a chair at Pulquería Los Insurgentes and try a few flavors. With an alcohol content equivalent to kombucha, you'll only stumble out the door a little bit.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Known as the Aztec drink of the gods, pulque has made a resurgence over the years in Mexico. Actually more delicious than it sounds, Pulque combines fermented agave sap with different flavors like mango, coconut, or guava. Pull up a chair at Pulquería Los Insurgentes and try a few flavors. With an alcohol content equivalent to kombucha, you'll only stumble out the door a little bit.

9. Agua de Jamaica (Hibiscus Juice)

Throughout Mexico City, Aguas Frescas are about as common as tacos. Refreshing and simple, the drink is a combination of sugar, juice, and water. One of the most curious flavors is Hibiscus flower, which tastes, and looks, a lot like cranberry.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Throughout Mexico City, Aguas Frescas are about as common as tacos. Refreshing and simple, the drink is a combination of sugar, juice, and water. One of the most curious flavors is Hibiscus flower, which tastes, and looks, a lot like cranberry.

10. Flan de Queso Chiapas at Fonda Fina

A simplistic serving of creamy cheese squares with guava and agave syrup, Flan de Queso Chiapas at Fonda Fina has the richness of cheesecake with a lighter texture.
Fonda Fina / Via fondafina.com.mx

A simplistic serving of creamy cheese squares with guava and agave syrup, Flan de Queso Chiapas at Fonda Fina has the richness of cheesecake with a lighter texture.

11. Chiles en Nogada at Restaurante Mercaderes

Chiles en Nogada gets its name from the Spanish word for walnut tree, nogal. To prepare the dish, a poblano chile is stuffed with minced meat, fruit, and spices, covered in a walnut cream sauce, then topped with pomegranate seeds and walnuts. A seasonal and patriotic dish, Chiles en Nogada is traditionally served through August and September coinciding with walnut season and Mexican Independence Day.
Laura Kiniry / Via Instagram: @https://www.instagram.com/laurajkin/?hl=en

Chiles en Nogada gets its name from the Spanish word for walnut tree, nogal. To prepare the dish, a poblano chile is stuffed with minced meat, fruit, and spices, covered in a walnut cream sauce, then topped with pomegranate seeds and walnuts. A seasonal and patriotic dish, Chiles en Nogada is traditionally served through August and September coinciding with walnut season and Mexican Independence Day.

12. Oaxacan-Style Black Mole Enchiladas at Azul

Eating anything coated in black mole is like having desert for dinner. Then when mole gets poured over cheese-stuffed tortillas, the rich chocolate-chili based sauce makes probably the most rich enchiladas you've ever had any time of day.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Eating anything coated in black mole is like having desert for dinner. Then when mole gets poured over cheese-stuffed tortillas, the rich chocolate-chili based sauce makes probably the most rich enchiladas you've ever had any time of day.

13. Molcajete at El León Dorado in El Desierto De Los Leones National Park

Forget a boring bowl, why not have soup served in a stone mortar? This rich stew at León Dorado Restaurant includes your meat of choice, crispy pork rinds (chicharron), salsa, guacamole, sausage, cheese, beans, chilies, and whatever else they decided to throw in for added flavor. Located in a national park just outside of the sprawling city, the view of pine trees out the windows isn't so bad either.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Forget a boring bowl, why not have soup served in a stone mortar? This rich stew at León Dorado Restaurant includes your meat of choice, crispy pork rinds (chicharron), salsa, guacamole, sausage, cheese, beans, chilies, and whatever else they decided to throw in for added flavor. Located in a national park just outside of the sprawling city, the view of pine trees out the windows isn't so bad either.

14. Provoleta at La Docena

A traditional Argentinean dish, provoleta is literally a thick slab of chargrilled provolone cheese. At La Docena, it's brought to the table sizzling off the grill and topped with fresh grilled tomatoes and Argentinean style chimichurri sauce, a combination of parsley, oregano, red pepper, olive oil, and vinegar. Also at La Docena give the Peruvian ceviche and Po Boys a try.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

A traditional Argentinean dish, provoleta is literally a thick slab of chargrilled provolone cheese. At La Docena, it's brought to the table sizzling off the grill and topped with fresh grilled tomatoes and Argentinean style chimichurri sauce, a combination of parsley, oregano, red pepper, olive oil, and vinegar. Also at La Docena give the Peruvian ceviche and Po Boys a try.

15. Escamoles at Balcón de Zócalo

You'd think you were actually eating risotto until someone told you it's actually ant larvae. Yes you heard correct, ant larvae. Escamoles are a delicacy in Mexico City and they are typically cooked with butter and spices then served in a variety of ways ... hopefully with enough fixings to make you forget your eating ant babies.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

You'd think you were actually eating risotto until someone told you it's actually ant larvae. Yes you heard correct, ant larvae. Escamoles are a delicacy in Mexico City and they are typically cooked with butter and spices then served in a variety of ways ... hopefully with enough fixings to make you forget your eating ant babies.

16. Pan de Elote with Peanut Butter Mousse at Hidden Kitchen

Pan de Elote is a pretty straightforward corn cake, but the chef at Mexico City's Hidden Kitchen dresses it up with peanut butter mousse and kettle corn. The pop-up style restaurant frequently changes locales, creating dinner experiences in unique, off-the-beaten-path venues around the city. The menu is also always changing.
Megan Snedden / Via MeganSnedden.com

Pan de Elote is a pretty straightforward corn cake, but the chef at Mexico City's Hidden Kitchen dresses it up with peanut butter mousse and kettle corn. The pop-up style restaurant frequently changes locales, creating dinner experiences in unique, off-the-beaten-path venues around the city. The menu is also always changing.

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