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This Five-Question Grammar And Punctuation Quiz Will Get You Ready For Spring

In like a lion, out like a lamb. A quiz from the BuzzFeed copydesk.

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  1. Though she loved the snow, <br>this past winter was <br>way too cold for Hana.

    What's wrong with this sentence?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    The comma after snow is unnecessary.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    It should be to, not too.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    As the sentence's subject, Hana is in the wrong place.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There's nothing wrong with this sentence.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Hana should follow the comma.

    This is a misplaced or dangling modifier. She refers to Hana, the subject of the sentence, and Hana should therefore follow the comma.

    Hana should follow the comma.
    Via Emojipedia
  2. "It should not be 20°F <br>in March, it's almost <br>spring," Zain complained.

    What's wrong with this sentence?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    The comma after spring belongs outside the quotation mark.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The comma after March should be a semicolon or a dash.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There shouldn't be an apostrophe in it's, i.e., it should be its.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There's nothing wrong with this sentence.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Kill the comma.

    There are two independent clauses here, so cut the comma and replace it with a semicolon or dash. (Alternatively, you could split it into two sentences.) Both British and American English put that comma inside the quotation mark.

    Kill the comma.
    Via Emojipedia
  3. I can't wait for all of the puddles, inside-out umbrellas, and my feet getting wet that come with the month of April.

    What's wrong with this sentence?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    The structure of the list isn't parallel.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The verb should be singular (comes), not plural (come).
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There should be a comma after wet.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There's nothing wrong with this sentence.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's not parallel.

    Ideally, this sentence should read something like, "I can't wait for all of the puddles, inside-out umbrellas, and wet feet that come with the month of April."

    It's not parallel.
    Via Emojipedia
  4. The best part of spring is:&nbsp;baby animals such as ducklings, chicks, and bunnies.&nbsp;

    What's wrong with this sentence?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    There shouldn't be a colon after is.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The is should actually be are.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There should be a capital S in spring.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There's nothing wrong with this sentence.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    There's no need for that colon!

    The verb is does a perfectly adequate job of introducing the list of baby animals, so you should lose the colon. (Also, the singular verb is agrees with best part.)

    There's no need for that colon!
    Via Emojipedia
  5. My border collie, Molly, my only dog, always lies in the wildflowers that bloom behind my house every May.

    What's wrong with this sentence?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    There should not be commas around Molly.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Wildflowers is actually two words.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    It should be lays, not lies.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    There's nothing wrong with this sentence.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    There's nothing wrong here!

    Lays requires a direct object (and is also the past tense of lies), wildflowers is one word (per Merriam-Webster), and those commas indicate a nonessential part of the sentence (i.e., the sentence has the same meaning without Molly).

    There's nothing wrong here!
    Via Emojipedia

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