back to top
Community

What Do You Really Know About Mental Illness?

Both historically and right now, sometimes what seems like common knowledge is far less accurate than it seems.

Posted on
  1. Bipolar disorder is characterized by...

    Ketter et al. // Stanford Medicine (via curiousaboutscience.net
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Brusque and extreme fluctuations of mood from episodes of mania (a hyperactive, reckless and delusion-filled state of mind) to depression (devastatingly low periods of hopelessness and despair).
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Changes of perspective or opinion on different matters in an erratic manner without any discernible reason behind these changes of heart.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Excessively frequent mood swings, with the sufferer suddenly and without warning or a trace of rational thought flipping between emotions.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Changes of mood from mania to depression

    These two moods are the most distinctive facets of the disorder (Overview of Mood Disorders) (American Psychiatric Association, 123 - 126). The two other answers are misconceptions of what the disorder is in actuality.

    Changes of mood from mania to depression
    Via Stephanie Marohn // innerself.com
  2. Is this statement true?

    maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Not true!

    Despite the sort of presence the mentally ill hold in the media, most individuals with mental disorders are no more likely to be violent than anyone else, with only 3 - 5% of violent crimes being directly attributable to people with serious psychological disorders (Mental Health Myths and Facts). In fact, people with mental health problems are over 10 times more likely to be on the receiving end of violent crimes than the general population (Mental Health Myths and Facts).

    Not true!
    Via Mike Ehrmantrout // healthyplace.com
  3. Of the following, what separates a formal diagnosis of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) from a normal facet of someone's personality?

    shutterstock.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    An excessive concern for the order and/or arrangement objects are in (especially when the sufferer's own possessions or symmetry-related issues are involved).
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Repetitive behaviors that the sufferer feels driven to perform in response to persistent intrusive thoughts that cause them marked distress (in order to relieve anxiety or dispel fear).
    Correct
    Incorrect
    An affinity for performing specific tasks in a particular and/or eccentric manner and a strong dislike for performing said task any other way.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Repetitive behaviors and intrusive thoughts

    Those who suffer from OCD engage in seemingly eccentric and ritualistic behavior to counter thoughts that distress them, not because it causes them enjoyment or they are particularly intolerant of other's ways of doing things. Their illness causes them to believe that if they don't perform these rituals, what they fear will come true despite said rituals having no logical effect on whether said fears become true. This cycle is extremely time-consuming and makes it difficult for them to lead a normal life (American Psychiatric Association, 237).

    Repetitive behaviors and intrusive thoughts
    Via eyeandmindclinic.in
  4. What was the first edition of the DSM (the official manual used to classify and diagnose mental illness in the US) not to class homosexuality as a disease?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    1st Edition (1952)
    Via longtailgifts.com
    1st Edition (1952)
    Correct
    Incorrect
    2nd Edition (1968)
    Via LGBT Mental Health Syllabus (aglp.org
    2nd Edition (1968)
    Via LGBT Mental Health Syllabus (aglp.org
    Correct
    Incorrect
    3rd Edition (1987)
    Via korrekt.com
    3rd Edition (1987)
    Correct
    Incorrect
    4th Edition (1994)
    Via goodreads.com
    4th Edition (1994)
    Correct
    Incorrect
    5th Edition (2013)
    Via aseeley2013 // autismsocietyofnc.wordpress.com
    5th Edition (2013)
    Via aseeley2013 // autismsocietyofnc.wordpress.com
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    3rd Edition (DSM III)

    After a revision of differing perspectives and theories, a decision was met in 1973 to remove homosexuality's classification as a disorder from the DSM (the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders'), which was reflected in its following edition (the DSM III, as this occurred post-DSM II publication). Unsurprisingly, this sparked an intense controversy but nonetheless the decision was not overturned (Drescher).

    3rd Edition (DSM III)
    Via stonegadget.com
  5. What mental disorder has the highest death rates?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Clinical depression
    Via Jamell Andrews // parental-journal.com
    Clinical depression
    Via Jamell Andrews // parental-journal.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Anorexia nervosa
    Via Avramoski Bobi // healadvice.com
    Anorexia nervosa
    Via Avramoski Bobi // healadvice.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Schizophrenia
    Via shutterstock.com
    Schizophrenia
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Anorexia nervosa

    Despite the fact that 50% of schizophrenia sufferers attempt suicide and approx. 15% of the clinically depressed succeed in taking their own lives, eating disorders remain the deadliest mental illnesses (Fields). The combined strain the illness exerts on the mind and on the body via malnutrition that kills in a variety of ways, such as "sudden heart attack [and] multiple organ failure" is coupled with very high suicide rates among those who have the disorder (Fields). This heightens the death rates to such extremes that "people with anorexia nervosa [have] a six fold increase in mortality compared to the general population" (Kaye).

    Anorexia nervosa
    Via lampran 05 (via arounddb.com
  6. Which of the following pairs of terms are synonyms?

    Jacqueline Nie // wbko.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Psychopathy and sociopathy
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Bipolar disorder and manic depression
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Bipolar disorder and manic depression

    Manic depression is merely an outdated term for bipolar disorder (American Psychiatric Association, 123 - 132). While psychopathy and sociopathy are both under the definition of antisocial personality disorder, psychopaths lack a conscience while sociopaths have a weak one (Mayer Robinson). Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, on the other hand, are separate eating disorders (American Psychiatric Organization, 338-350).

    Bipolar disorder and manic depression
    Via shutterstock.com
  7. Is this statement true?

    maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Not true!

    Warning signs of psychological disorders can be perceived even in very young children. First signs of mental disorders appear before the age of 14. Three quarters of all mental disorders begin before the age of 24 (Mental Health Myths and Facts), and in fact the average age of onset for anxiety disorders is 11 years old (Carter). However, less than 20% of children with diagnosable psychological conditions are given treatment (Mental Health Myths and Facts).

    Not true!
    Via Laura Anabelle // medium.com
  8. The following are procedures that were used to treat mental illnesses. Which one was widely considered normal more recently?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Lobotomy - needle (orbitoclast pictured above) is inserted into frontal lobe
    Via Mical Raz // thepsychologist.bps.org.uk–-patients-stories
    Lobotomy - needle (orbitoclast pictured above) is inserted into frontal lobe
    Via Mical Raz // thepsychologist.bps.org.uk–-patients-stories
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Insulin (induced) coma therapy
    Via Grace Eire // littlethings.com
    Insulin (induced) coma therapy
    Via Grace Eire // littlethings.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Chemically induced seizures
    Via cerebromente.org.br
    Chemically induced seizures
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Insulin coma therapy

    The procedure of inducing a coma via insulin was invented in 1927 and didn't fade away until the 1960s (Schwartzs). Lobotomies didn't "rapidly [fall] out of favor" until the mid-1950s (Levinson). The practice of chemically induced seizures was discredited around the 1940s (Tripiccio).

  9. Of the following, what is schizophrenia characterized by?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    The sufferer's expression of two or more identities, demonstrating a marked discontinuity in sense of self and agency and related changes of behavior, perception, etc. as well as memory gaps that are inconsistent with normal forgetting.
    Via SIlja Eystberg Wendelboe // siljavich.deviantart.com
    The sufferer's expression of two or more identities, demonstrating a marked discontinuity in sense of self and agency and related changes of behavior, perception, etc. as well as memory gaps that are inconsistent with normal forgetting.
    Via SIlja Eystberg Wendelboe // siljavich.deviantart.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Persistent, disruptive and stress-inducing delusions and hallucinations (namely auditory disturbances such as voices). Additional symptoms include disorganized speech, catatonic behavior, diminished emotional expression or diminished motivation.
    Via Laura Mitchell // dailystar.co.uk
    Persistent, disruptive and stress-inducing delusions and hallucinations (namely auditory disturbances such as voices). Additional symptoms include disorganized speech, catatonic behavior, diminished emotional expression or diminished motivation.
    Via Laura Mitchell // dailystar.co.uk
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Delusions and hallucinations

    Contrary to popular belief, schizophrenia's main symptoms revolve around a distorted perception of reality (American Psychiatric Association, 99-100), not the expression of multiple personalities (in actuality, this corresponds to dissociative identity or 'split personality' disorder (Multiple Personality Disorder)(American Psychiatric Association, 292)).

    Delusions and hallucinations
    Via shutterstock.com
  10. The symptom an individual must report in order to be diagnosed with major depressive disorder is...

    American Psychological Association // apa.org
    Correct
    Incorrect
    A feeling of sadness, emptiness and/or hopelessness that is present most of the day, practically every day.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    A marked decrease or even lack of interest and/or enjoyment in almost all activities performed by the patient in their day to day life.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Both of the above.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Both of the above.

    Major depression is a complex disorder with a range of symptoms; the ones listed above are the two that primarily characterize the illness. The other symptoms can be both psychological (diminished ability to concentrate, indecisiveness, feelings of worthlessness, excessive or inappropriate guilt, or recurring suicidal thoughts) and physical (weight loss or gain (when not dieting); increased or decreased appetite; persistent loss or lack of energy; sleeping too much or too little; and restlessness or feeling slowed down), and at least five of these other symptoms must be present (American Psychiatric Association, 160-161).

    Both of the above.
    Via Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (via medicinenet.com
  11. People who suffer from disorders of this group/spectrum of mental illnesses are typically aware that they have a problem.

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Anxiety disorders
    Via shutterstock.com
    Anxiety disorders
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Personality disorders
    Via whatispersonalitydisorder.com
    Personality disorders
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Eating disorders
    Via stgeorgehospital.org
    Eating disorders
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Anxiety disorders

    Most people who suffer from anxiety disorders are well aware that they have an illness and don't like what it does to them; they experience intense feelings of fear, tension, apprehension and other unpleasant symptoms, such as restlessness, fatigue, sleep disturbances and others (i.e. during panic attacks, fear of dying, chest pains, palpitations or light-headedness) (American Psychiatric Association, 189-223). These symptoms are persistent, whether they appear in response to specific situations, objects or places or for no discernible reason (American Psychiatric Association, 189-223). In the case of personality disorders, since they are consistent patterns of thought and behavior, they relate to how the sufferer conducts themselves. This leads to the impairment the illness causes not being identified as an indicator of a problem with themselves (American Psychiatric Association, 645-649). On the other hand, those who suffer from eating disorders typically deny having a problem, as they suffer a delusion that they are overweight and are deeply distressed by this perception and thus the actions they undertake to change that seem completely reasonable (Fields).

  12. Answer the following question.

    maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Via maria2304 // buzzfeed.com
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Yes, because they affect everyone

    Just because you don't have one doesn't mean they don't affect you. Mental illness is very common; they affect all kinds of people. In 2014, "1 in 5 American adults experienced a mental health issue," and "1 in 25 Americans lived with a major psychological disorder," (Mental Health Myths and Facts). Additionally, 46.4% of Americans will experience a diagnosable psychological disorder in their lifetime (Carter). Chances are, someone you know suffers from one despite how mentally healthy they my seem, as they are highly valuable and productive members of our societies (Mental Health Myths and Facts).

    Yes, because they affect everyone
    Via Chelsey B. Coombs // gizmodo.com.au

Works Cited (Learn More)

Santoso, Alex. “10 Mind-Boggling Psychiatric Treatments.” Neatorama, 12 June 2007, www.neatorama.com/2007/06/12/10-mind-boggling-psychiatric-treatments/.

Levinson, Hugh. “The Strange and Curious History of Lobotomy.” BBC News, BBC, 8 Nov. 2011, www.bbc.com/news/magazine-15629160.

Mayer Robinson, Kara, and Joseph Goldberg. “Sociopath vs. Psychopath: What’s the Difference?” WebMD, WebMD, www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/sociopath-psychopath-difference.

Fields, R. Douglas. “The Deadliest Disorder.” Psychology Today, HealthProfs.com, 11 Mar. 2011, www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-new-brain/201103/the-deadliest-disorder-0.

Kaye, Walter. “Mortality and Eating Disorders.” National Eating Disorders Association, 4GirlsFoundation, www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/mortality-and-eating-disorders.

Hamilton, Gail et al. “Anorexia Nervosa – Highest Mortality Rate of Any Mental Disorder: Why?” Eating Disorder Hope, Eating Disorders Coalition, www.eatingdisorderhope.com/information/anorexia/anorexia-nervosa-highest-mortality-rate-of-any-mental-disorder-why.

Drescher, Jack. “Out of DSM: Depathologizing Homosexuality.” US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4695779/.

“Overview of Mood Disorders.” Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library, Johns Hopkins Medicine, www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/conditions/mental_health_disorders/overview_of_mood_disorders_85,P00759/.

“Mental Health Myths and Facts .” MentalHealth.gov, U.S. Department of Health &Amp; Human Services, www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/myths-facts/.

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5. Vol. 5. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association, 2013. Print.

“Dissociative Identity Disorder (Multiple Personality Disorder).” WebMD , WebMD, www.webmd.com/mental-health/dissociative-identity-disorder-multiple-personality-disorder.

“Manic Depression (Manic Depressive Disorder): Symptoms, Treatments, Causes, and More.” WebMD, WebMD, www.webmd.com/depression/guide/bipolar-disorder-manic-depression#1.

Carter, Joe. “9 Things You Should Know About Mental Health.” TGC - The Gospel Coalition, TGC - The Gospel Coalition, 27 May 2015, www.thegospelcoalition.org/article/9-things-you-should-know-about-mental-health.

Schwartz / AlterNet, Larry. “8 Horrific 'Cures' for Mental Illness Through the Ages.” Alternet, 16 Dec. 2014, www.alternet.org/personal-health/8-horrific-cures-mental-illness-through-ages.

Tripiccio, Adalberto. “MEDUNA, Ladislas-Joseph Von (1896-1964).” RedePsi, 20 Feb. 2008, www.redepsi.com.br/2008/02/20/meduna-ladislas-joseph-von-1896-1964/.

This post was created by a member of BuzzFeed Community, where anyone can post awesome lists and creations. Learn more or post your buzz!
Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.