Photos Reveal The Hidden Lives Of London’s Squatters

Photographer Corinna Kern’s project A Place Called Home documents London’s squatting scene.

In an email to BuzzFeed, Kern wrote:

“Squatting is often a conscious choice of an alternative and communal way of living. On 1st of September 2012 the new section 144 of the Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill (LASPO) came into force rendering squatting in residential buildings a criminal offence. Hence, squatting can legally only be attempted in commercial premises with the result that squatters often occupy unusual premises that contradict the conventional idea of home.”

To protect the privacy of squatters, Kern has chosen not to reveal actual addresses.

“The Castle”

A resident washes his hair in the communal washrooms in “The Castle”, a squat once used as a five-storey office block. At one point the building accommodated more than 100 squatters and was used as a location for parties. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

A room in The Castle after a rave. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

“Borough High Street”

A squatter holds two lighters hanging from the ceiling in “Borough High Street”, a squat in a grade II listed building. The communally used lighters are attached with strings to not get lost in among the 20 people living in the squat. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

The communal squatting lifestyle often creates strong bonds between the residents and a family feeling. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

“The Fabric Storehouse”

A girl draws in her new home, a squatted fabric storehouse. Hundreds of abandoned fabric rolls are used as bed sheets and pillows, decorations for ceilings and walls and to section rooms and set up little tents. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com

A squatter takes a rest in shelves used to store fabric rolls inside the squatted fabric storehouse. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

“The Garden Centre”

A greenhouse in the squatted “Garden Centre”. The main greenhouse is used as the living room. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

Residents watch videos in the living room of their home, the Garden Centre, a former greenhouse of a plant nursery. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

“Downtown Restaurant”

Residents are building and repairing in a squat called €˜Downtown Restaurant, a former cabaret restaurant in London. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

After having taken a bucket shower, a resident stands on the terrace of Downtown Restaurant. Since located in commercial premises, squats often do not have showers, unless the residents build their own. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

“Blackfriars”

A girl has breakfast in Blackfriars. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

Two residents relax in Blackfriars, a squat in a run-down building without water facilities and electricity. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

“Kentish Town”

A room from fabrics in a Kentish Town squat, a building that was formerly used as design studios in London, United Kingdom. Private sphere is rare in squats since several people usually share one room. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com

A girl hugs a dog in the Kentish Town Squat. Corinna Kern / lensculture.com / Via reportagebygettyimages.com





















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