back to top

The Decline And Fall Of The Western Roman Empire, Explained By Minions

This is a complex issue, and therefore Minions should explain it.

Posted on
Advertisement
Advertisement

But the impact of this campaign was significant. In 235 AD Emperor Alexander Severus had been deposed as a direct result of his focus on the Sassanid threat, instead of that from German barbarians.

The protracted conflict was also expensive, and lower tax revenue due to a continually debased currency meant it could not be shared among everyone. In the end, the army got the bulk of it.

Advertisement

As a result, over the course of decades, people began to leave the cities to practise subsistence agriculture, further stripping the empire of its income, and the cities of their population.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

At this point, the lack of control and long-distance adminstration options meant large operations failed repeatedly - Africa, Carthage, more of Gaul and German territories were all lost over the next three decades.

Advertisement

Note: This is one interpretation of events - there are many. This version primarily uses Peter Heather's, The Fall of the Roman Empire (2005) and Bryan Ward-Perkins's The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilization (2005).