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Here's How To Get One Of Those $25 Loblaws Gift Cards

But read the fine print.

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Aaron Vincent Elkaim / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Registration is now open for those $25 Loblaws gift cards, made available to the public after it was revealed the grocer played a part in fixing bread prices for more than a decade.

To register, Canadians can go to LoblawCard.ca and fill in a form. The cut off is May 8, and you must be 18 or 19 years old to register, depending on your province.

The cards are meant for people who bought bread at a Loblaw store — including Loblaws, No Frills, Provigo, Superstore, and others — between 2002 and March 2015. But you don't need to provide proof of purchase, so don't worry if you can't recall your particular bread-buying habits.

Many people have suggested donating the card to a food bank instead of keeping it.

Loblaws is giving away 3-6 million $25 gift cards because of fraud Loblaws participated in. Request your gift card… https://t.co/uADqiiW2N6

I just signed up for my card from Loblaws so I can send it to the food bank. It doesn't affect your involvement in… https://t.co/qqPIuEeynV

The company is offering the cards as a way to make up for the price fixing, but accepting one doesn't mean you can't join in on a class action lawsuit. The only catch, according to Loblaw, is that the $25 will be subtracted from any further compensation.

"Registering for and obtaining the $25 Loblaw Card will not affect customers’ right to participate in any class action or to receive any incremental compensation that may be awarded by the court," the website says.

The cards come with a full five pages of fine print, and won't be valid for buying gas, cooking classes, or alcohol and tobacco.

Loblaw wasn't the only company to have allegedly fixed bread prices, but they are the only one who has so far been granted immunity by the Competition Bureau. Sobeys, Metro, Walmart, and Giant Tiger are also under investigation, as is breadmaker Canada Bread.

A class-action suit has already been launched by an Ontario woman to the tune of $1 billion dollars.

Lauren Strapagiel is a reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in Toronto, Canada.

Contact Lauren Strapagiel at lauren.strapagiel@buzzfeed.com.

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