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    Tina Turner Deserved So Much Better From The Media, And Here Are 14 Moments That Prove It

    "Out of all the [solo] success I was having, why are they talking about Ike and Tina?" —Tina Turner

    On March 27, HBO Max released a documentary, titled Tina, about legendary rock 'n' roll singer Tina Turner.

    Tina Turner circa early-'80s staring into the camera, wearing makeup and pearl earrings
    HBO Max

    In the documentary, Turner reflects on her life as a performer and the deep trauma she experienced from the media whenever they brought up ex-husband Ike Turner's domestic abuse during their 16-year marriage.

    Voice-over of Tina saying: "Out of all the success that I was having, why are they talking about Ike and Tina? I'm beginning to get really, very depressed"
    HBO Max / Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

    Here are moments when the media horribly failed Tina Turner, highlighted in the documentary and beyond.

    Warning: This post contains topics of domestic abuse and physical abuse.

    1. When an Australian anchor showed Tina a clip of Ike — without her consent — talking about how he physically abused her, and expected her to react to it.

    Ike Turner saying: "I would slap Tina," and when asked by the News anchor if Tina had a comment, she said: "I don't want to start an argument with Ike via satellite. I have nothing to say"
    Nine Network

    2. When Tina attended the Venice Film Festival in 1993 and was asked why she refused to watch What's Love Got to Do with It, the biopic about her life and abusive relationship with Ike Turner.

    Tina telling the press: "This constant reminder...it's not so good. I'm not happy about it. So, do I want to sit and watch the violence and brutality? No"
    HBO Max

    3. When she was promoting Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome in 1985, and in the middle of the interview, she was randomly asked what she thought about Ike Turner's arrest for drug possession.

    Tina responding with: "I'd like to hear positive things. I'd love to hear that Ike had a record deal and he was producing an album"
    HBO Max

    4. When Mike Wallace pushed a question on Tina he knew was wrong, asking if the physical violence from Ike had any influence on her decision to have plastic surgery.

    Tina correcting Mike Wallace: "There's a difference in cosmetic and corrective surgery"
    CBS

    5. When Roseanne Barr interviewed Ike Turner on her talk show in 1999 and gave him a platform to "apologize" to Tina and "express his side of the story."

    Ike talking to the camera: "I am very sorry and I did a lot of things wrong in my life, but the way they portrayed me in 'What's Love Got to Do with It' is not me"
    CBS

    6. And when other talk show hosts, like Arsenio Hall, continued to give Ike a platform, where he victim-blamed Tina for the domestic abuse during their marriage.

    Arsenio asking Ike if Tina caused Americans to look at him in a negative way, and Ike responding with: "Positively. I didn't think it was as bad as it was"
    Paramount Studios

    7. When Tina felt physically overwhelmed and traumatized during an early 2000s interview after she was forced to answer yet another question about leaving Ike in the late 1970s.

    Tina responding with: "We are going to talk about him, aren't we? I need my fan now, I just had a flush"
    HBO Max

    8. And when Oprah asked Tina if Cher had any impact on her decision to leave Ike, and she looked tired of answering the same triggering question.

    Tina responding with: "You know, Oprah, I really don't remember"
    ABC

    9. When Access Hollywood inappropriately requested a comment from Tina after Ike Turner — her abuser of 16 years — died in 2007.

    Tina's statement to AH: "Tina hasn't had any contact with Ike in more than 30 years. No further comment will be made"
    Access Hollywood / David Redfern / Getty Images / Via accessonline.com

    10. And when the New York Post reported Ike Turner's death with this horrific headline that was intended to be punny, but was actually horribly abusive and out of line.

    New York Post headline that reads: "IKE 'BEATS' TINA TO DEATH"
    New York Post

    The article has since been deleted.

    11. When the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted Ike and Tina Turner as a duo in 1991, long after the domestic abuse was public knowledge, and put Tina in a fearful and compromising position.

    An image of Tina Turner at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony; a block of text that reads: "Someone handed me a program to sign and I was shocked to see Ike's signature on it -- I looked across the room and there he was"
    Images Press / Getty Images

    In Turner's 2018 autobiography My Love Story, she went on to describe her deep fear that night at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in New York City, and how she felt simultaneously relieved because she moved to Europe.

    She said: "We didn't come face-to-face that day, or any other day, as it turns out, but our near encounter reminded me how nice it was to be in a place where I didn't have to worry about him coming around every corner. I could forget about him in a foreign country."

    12. When Oprah disregarded Tina's boundaries and asked if she paid back the hotel that financially supported her the night she left Ike in the late 1970s.

    ABC

    13. When Saturday Night Live mocked the cruel moment when Ike forced Tina to eat an entire cake in a diner, which was featured in What's Love Got to Do with It.

    Tim Meadows as Ike Turner shoving a box of candy in Kevin Nealon's face; Laurence Fishburne as Ike Turner in "What's Love Got to Do with It" shoving cake in Tina Turner's mouth (played by Angela Bassett)
    NBC / Touchstone Pictures

    14. And when interviewers from the 1990s and 2000s asked Tina a series of ridiculous questions that made her feel uncomfortable, which was highlighted in Part IV of the Tina documentary.

    Interview questions: "What do you think attracts women to bad men? "When you were married to Ike, what was the absolutely worst moment?"
    HBO Max

    If you or someone you know is in immediate danger as a result of domestic violence, call 911. For anonymous, confidential help, you can call the 24/7 National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 (SAFE) or chat with an advocate via the website.

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