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Can You Guess Which Creature Prefers The Dark?

In honor of Earth Hour, pick the one you think is a night owl.

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This Saturday is Earth hour, when people and landmarks worldwide will symbolically shut off their lights in support of climate action.

Wang Zhao / AFP / Getty Images

China's National Stadium, known as the Bird's Nest.

In honor of the event, can you guess which animal prefers nighttime?

  1. michal-rojek / Thinkstock
    nattanan726 / Thinkstock
    nattanan726 / Thinkstock
    MikeLane45 / Thinkstock
    MikeLane45 / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    These underground residents prefer the dark to avoid desert heat. Though fennec foxes are the smallest foxes in the world, their satellite ears can be up to 6 inches, and the size helps them regulate their temperature amid scorching days and chilly evenings.

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    LorraineHudgins / Thinkstock
    LorraineHudgins / Thinkstock
    J. Michael Lockhart / USFWS / Via commons.wikimedia.org
    J. Michael Lockhart / USFWS / Via commons.wikimedia.org
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    These nighttime bandits can sleep up to 21 hours a day! Their diet of choice includes squirrels and mice, but prairie dogs make up the majority of it, which they hunt at night. (Prairie dogs are up most of the day looking for food.) The ferrets are also fossorial, meaning they live underground. And though they've come back from the brink of extinction, black-footed ferrets still need a lot of help. You can symbolically adopt one here!

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    Robert Kovacs / Thinkstock
    Robert Kovacs / Thinkstock
    Byrdyak / Thinkstock
    Byrdyak / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Arthur must have been extraordinarily tired during school because aardvarks are nocturnal! Natives of Africa, they escape the harsh sun underground, which they burrow into using their claws that look like little spades, according to National Geographic. When the sun sets, they emerge and snuffle for termites (their favorite) using their long tongues.

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    Miklos Schiberna / Creative Commons / Via en.wikipedia.org
    Miklos Schiberna / Creative Commons / Via en.wikipedia.org
    John E. Newby / WWF
    John E. Newby / WWF
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Frilled lizards are diurnal, meaning they're active during the day. Though its armor makes it look like a reptile, the pangolin is actually a scaly mammal. Their scales are made of keratin, like your hair, and form a heavy-duty layer when they curl up into a ball to protect themselves. They're also one of the most trafficked mammals in Asia for their meat, but especially their scales, which are used in traditional remedies.

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    Fritz Pölking / WWF
    Fritz Pölking / WWF
    Lukashev / Thinkstock
    Lukashev / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Though owls tend to be nocturnal, snowy owls are actually day owls! Night herons are seen in the day looking a bit sullen, but when sunlight wanes, they start to forage, according to Audubon.

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    pigphoto / Thinkstock
    pigphoto / Thinkstock
    javarman3 / iStock
    javarman3 / iStock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    While both rarely descend to the ground, aye-ayes spend their days curled up in nests while gibbons are swinging around town (well, their town, which is a rainforest).

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    Edwin Giesbers / WWF
    Edwin Giesbers / WWF
    ChatchawalPhumkaew / Thinkstock
    ChatchawalPhumkaew / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Tree frogs snooze during the day, and they use their suction-cup toes to cling to the undersides of leaves to sleep. Their bright eyes are thought to be a distraction to predators, which gives the frogs a little more time to escape. Dragonflies are typically diurnal.

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    Elena Schweitzer / Thinkstock
    Elena Schweitzer / Thinkstock
    MHeizman / Thinkstock
    MHeizman / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Two-toed sloths are so slow, it's probably best they hang out in the dark away from any potential threats. Believe it or not, they're actually great swimmers and can plunk into water and breaststroke their merry way to their destination. Coquerel's sifaka, a fun name to try and pronounce, are the opposite: They're springy lemurs named after the sound they make (shi-fakh, shi-fakh, shi-fakh!).

Can You Guess Which Creature Prefers The Dark?

Science Writer

Contact Kasia Galazka at kasia.galazka@buzzfeed.com.

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